Jim Green

Profile Updated: September 7, 2017
Jim Green
Residing In Wichita, KS USA
Spouse/Partner Presently single
Occupation Systems and Software
Children Dyan Green, b. 1981, with Susan Hull Green, married at WSU in 1975.
Susan eventually got a degree More…in accounting at WSU.
Yes! Attending Reunion
Comments

MSEE 1977, WSU, Dept of Electrical Engineering.
Physics and Mathematics grad, KU 1974.
Hardware and software designer in the industrial world.
Served both civilian graphics arts industry and military sectors.
Recently concentrating on Life Extension and Anti-Aging medicine themes.
Also interested in business, business trends, and financial management.

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Jul 09, 2019 at 4:33 PM

Garlic [Index, Garlic as telomerase activator (178), Wikipedia, WebMD/Garlic, LifeExtension,
Garlic Central, Jen Reviews/Garlic,
Links/Garlic, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF;
Links/Crushed garlic as an antibiotic, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF;
Links/anticancer garlic, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books,
Links/Garlic suppresses atherosclerosis, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF;
Links/Crushed garlic as a platelet aggregation inhibitor, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF;
Links/Garlic as an antioxidant, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF;
Links/Garlic as a Vasodilator, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF; Vasodilators.
Links/Allicin as a Vasodilator, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF; Vasodilators.
Links/Garlic and NK cell activity enhancement, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF; NK Cell Activity Enhancers;
Links/Garlic as a platelet aggregation inhibitor, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF; Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors;
Papers/garlic and telomere lengthening; Genital Warts; toxicity, dosage; Recipes/Garlic;
Garlic History (Links, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension); Allicin,
AMPK activators/Garlic; Antibiotics, Antioxidants, Anti-inflammatory nutraceuticals, Apoptosis Inducers/Garlic;
Fibrinogen, More…Hypertension, NFkB Inhibitors, NK Cell Activity Enhancers, Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors, Viral Cures; Garlic Lillies, Onion Lillies; Lillies of the Field; Onions].

Introduction and Overview
Crushed garlic (Allium sativum) dosed [17] at 3-5 cloves per serving from an 8-clove bulb [25], 3 servings per day, (suitably mixed with artificial sweetener, chopped apples, salad dressing, and taken on soda crackers) kills nearly all non-eukaryotic cells, viruses, prokaryotic bacteria, and fungi associated with diseases including veneral diseases, abcessed teeth, facial infections, appendicitis, and cancer, and is very powerful as apoptosis-inducing anticancer medicine for reducing and eliminating cancerous tumors. Furthermore, garlic enhances the activity of Natural Killer cells of the immune system that attack and consume cancer cells, cells showing signs of oncogenic stress, pathogens, and pro-inflammatory senescent cells replacable with stem cells. Garlic is also an NFkB inhibitor and source of NFkB inhibitors that inhibits cancer metastasis. Furthermore, it is anti-inflammatory, suppresses atherosclerosis, and reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke, and dementia. Working as an HDAC inhibitor expanding chromatin to improve protein transcription, garlic extends the Hayflick Limit for cell division by producing more hTERT protein for telomerase and also works for muscle, bone, and healthy tissue growth. In this way it often works in quadrature, in a parallel way, with other telomerase activators using a different mechanism. Thus, celebrated with onions as one of the Lillies of the Field (onion lillies, garlic lillies), and often effective against threatening or deadly infections in just three days, garlic has been lauded as a panacea, miracle cure, or "resurrectant" and applied against the approach of plagues and otherwise certain death or disfigurement.

Garlic also activates AMPK, promoting cellular autophagy and working against obesity.

Garlic is a platelet aggregation inhibitor, and somewhat useful as a thrombolytic drug working against blood clotting. Garlic might have saved millions from the Black Death, cholera, and malaria, but enthusiasm for it has always been tempered by garlic halitosis due to crushed garlic's gaseous, penetrating diallyl disulfide, a fine sex repellant, so that it has been used to repel suiters while travelling through Greece by merely clutching a peeled clove of garlic in one hand. As it strikes against disease, garlic inhibits "sin" with a medicinal "Go and sin no more" aura resembling an insect repellant until dropping its use after a cure enables a "remission" of sins.

Garlic as a Telomerase Activator for Normal Cells and Telomerase Inhibitor for Cancer Cells
Garlic behaves like a Hayflick-Limit extending telomerase inducer (178) for normal cells, evidently by promoting hTERT mRNA transcription with the HDAC inhibitors diallyl disulfide and allyl mercaptan from crushed garlic allicin, as measured in 1994 for normal, non-cancerous human fibroblasts by Suresh I. Rattan and his European school [3]. Note that garlic contains the HDAC inhibitor diallyl disulfide producing the better HDAC inhibitor allyl mercaptan, and seems to be a telomerase inhibitor for cancer cells only, functioning as a telomerase activator (178) for normal cells. Diallyl disulfide increases histone H3 and H4 acetylation in K652 human leukemia cells (a human myeloid leukemia cell line). It may be that crushed garlic (which contains diallyl disulfide) can markedly improve the transcription of hTERT mRNA. See longevityscratchpadlog.html for the associated searches. We find that garlic increases the Hayflick Limit [Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF] from 49 cell divisions to more than 55 for normal fibroblasts [3], more than 12%. This may be true for all non-cancerous human cells.

Garlic is a supplement that improves Natural Killer cell (NK cell) activity, boosting immune system defense. Natural Killer cells consume proinflammatory senescent cells, allowing them to be replaced by stem cells.

Furthermore, garlic improves AMPK signaling to stimulate autophagy that consumes cellular junk and reduces triglycerides and glucose in the blood. Strong AMPK signaling purges the body of prematurely senescent cells [[50], [51], Patents, Books], as without sufficient AMPK signaling, such cells often do not have enough ATP energy to commit apoptosis [49]. Until they are eliminated, senescent cells packed with cellular junk contribute to inflammation.

Garlic Treats Cancer
See Garlic Treats Cancer [Books]. Diallyl disulfide and allicin from garlic induce apoptosis in a wide variety of cancer cells. Diallyl disulfide from allicin in crushed garlic induces apoptosis in bladder cancer cells [8]. Diallyl disulfide induced apoptosis has also been reported for colon cancer cells. Allicin from crushed garlic can inhibit telomerase activity and induce apoptosis in gastric cancer cells [9]. Thryoid Cancer [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF] can be caused by swallowing semen. Thyroid cancer can often be cured by crushed garlic, or by allicin [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].

Garlic is an apoptosis-inducing anticancer telomerase inhibitor for cancer cells via allicin and is listed as anti-inflammatory. Garlic seems to be an anticancer telomerase activator for normal cells. Garlic should improve telomerase activation in normal cells from telomerase activators such as TA-65, astragalus, and cycloastragenol working through the MAP kinase pathway or as hTERT mRNA transcriptional activators from exercise, such as HIF-1, by improving transcription of normal cell proteins. Garlic increases the activity of Natural Killer cells of the immune system [2]. See Stomach Cancer. [25c]. Increased intake of garlic reduced risk of certain cancers according to population studies, including cancers of the stomach, colon, esophagus, pancreas, and breast. The higher the amount of raw and cooked garlic consumed, the lower the risk of stomach and colorectal cancer. In another study, higher intakes of onion and garlic were associated with a reduced risk of intestinal cancer. Garlic (with its allicin) is a small molecule telomerase inhibitor [List] for cancer cells.

Garlic as an Antibiotic
Garlic as an antibiotic (Allicin): Adult dosage: take 3-5 cloves 3x per day after meals, chop up, mix with honey, mustard, or barbeque sauce, add artificial sweetener, and chew; take on soda crackers and wash down with water or juice. A peppercorn salad dressing with extra sweetener mixed with the garlic and taken on soda crackers makes it a treat. Most infections go away after several days of treatment, including facial infections from bad teeth. Note that cancer and Alzheimer's disease can eventually be triggered by TNF-alpha and NF-KB from inflammation associated with such infections, so that garlic is a real life-saver. Garlic is effective against a wide range of bacteria and viruses, including Heliobacter pylori (causes stomach cancer), the HIV virus and the HPV virus. Allicin from crushed garlic induces apoptosis in cervical cancer cells, and also kills the HPV virus. Note that berberine induces apoptosis in cervical cancer cells and simlarly attacks genital warts, as does the Shiitake mushroom. There are current 2014 reports that allicin from crushed garlic has been used effectively against all bacteria and viruses that it has been tested on. Allicin has a short half-life, so take it from freshly crushed garlic cloves. For immediate treatment against HPV genital warts, use apple cider vinegar in cotton applied to the warty tissue for up to six days. I would then suggest taking garlic orally 3-5 cloves/serving for 3 servings per day mixed with chopped apples and salad dressing on soda crackers until all HPV viral particles are destroyed, for up to a maximum of 6 weeks. This kills the HPV virion and prevents recurrence of the HPV warts. Shiitake mushrooms may be superior to garlic against HPV, cervical cancer, and for NK Cell activity enhancement. Garlic can kill all friendly bacteria in the intestinal tract when taken orally, including the bacteria that make vitamin K2, which returns calcium to the bones and prevents aortic stenosis. The bacteria must be replaced with probiotics or acidophilus, to avoid yeast infections. Swiss cheese may be a good source for vitamin K2-producing bacteria, as it is a fine source of vitamin K2. (Swiss cheese is traditionally raw, but may be pasteurized. Aging is used to destroy undesired microbial species in Swiss cheese.) A probiotic "active culture" yogurt is often used to replace friendly intestinal tract bacteria.

Note that rubber gloves should be worn when cutting and skinning garlic cloves, as otherwise fingertip skin may peel where fresh garlic was handled. Alternatively, dip your fingers in water. Finely chop garlic to crush it and let it set half a minute to produce allicin, and its diallyl disulfide and allyl mercaptan. Do not cook it, as that destroys these compounds. Add to soups after they are cooked, not before. Prefer taking it raw mixed with salad on crackers. Always take garlic raw, since cooking can destroy garlic allicin.

Can garlic cure appendicitis? Garlic is an effective cure for early-stage appendicitis.

Can garlic cure sepsis? "The list of microbes that garlic can slay includes botulism (not necessarily), tuberculosis, diarrhea, staph, dysentery, pneumonia, sepsis and typhoid." from Garlic Infection Fighter and Virus Killer.

See also Garlic Treats Viral Diseases [Books, Viral Cures, Viral Pathogens] such as the common cold, polio, and HIV. It is also suspected that garlic is useful against every prokaryotic bacterial pathogen, including pathogens behind syphylis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and anthrax. It is not certain that garlic is safe for babies and toddlers. Only yeast infections seem to be relatively immune to garlic as a cure. Yeast is a primative eukaryotic cell, the kind garlic spares at the prescribed dose while killing most or all bacteria (prokaryotic cells), fungi, and viruses.



Chopped garlic cures chronic inflammatory bowel diseases including abcesses from anal fistulas sometimes resulting from fisting, crohn's disease infections, and ulcerative colitis.

Garlic use must be cycled as garlic cannot be taken every day. This is to avoid yeast infections and to restock vitamin K2-producing bacteria with probiotic cheese and yogurt.

Garlic reduces hypertension [18], being a platelet aggregation inhibitor.

Garlic suppresses atherosclerosis [Patents, Books, LifeExtension] [5], [6], [7].

Garlic increases the HDL/LDL cholesterol ratio, decreases oxidation of LDL, and lowers triglyceride levels [18], tending to reverse atherosclerosis. Garlic removes arterial fatty streaks seen in the formation of atherosclerotic plaque [Books, LEF]. Aged garlic extract at 2400 mg/day for a year reduces arterial plaque burden [23], [24]. Cardiac computed tomography angiography [Links, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books] screening is conducted in such studies to assess coronary plaque volume, including total plaque volume, dense calcium, noncalcified plaque, and low-attenuation plaque vulnerable to rupture.

Garlic suppresses fibrinogen activity and reduces platelet aggregation [18].

Garlic is an antioxidant, which tends to suppress amyloid beta plaque formation in Alzheimer's Disease, LDL perioxidation tending to produce cardiovascular disease, and damaging ROS.

Cultivating Garlic [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books].
Without a greenhouse, garlic is usually planted on the shortest day (Winter Solstice) and harvested around the longest day (Summer Solstice). Garlic bulbs can be made larger by planting earlier in the Fall, instead of at the Winter Solstice.

Garlic Odor Repulsive
Finally, garlic is a "therapeutic" substance that can make you smell bad, and its fumes are a sex repellant that can get you shown out of a study hall, whether you smell it or not. It is best as a stay-at-home remedy for an infection to be cured in 3 days. Chronic use to equip you with youthful, expanded euchromatin to improve transcription of hTERT requires masking garlic odor with a selection or two from parsley, green tea, peppermint tea, mint, fennel, cloves, anise seeds, oral breath sprays, milk, coffee beans, and cologne.

The Crushed Garlic of the Medichants Better than NKVD Killer Cures for VD
I have seen the difference between healers at the table with garlic wisdom at their command, and NKVD at the table with destruction on their minds, using medicine and injections for the slaughter of sinners. NKVD are scary and believe in Killer Cures for VD instead of garlic cures. Garlic cures every bacterial form of VD, and quite possibly every viral form of VD from sex, fun, and frolic without rubbers. The more people know about how to fix themselves, the more they can joyously commune with each other via the joy of sex. This is why we find garlic bulbs producing The Lillies of the Field on tops of church spires such as St. Basil's Cathedral in Moscow and throughout Russia, also resembling hard cock tops. If you know about garlic, you can boogie more, although it smells like a sex repellant, and not like Channel No. 5. However, suprises like Twilight Zone male pregnancy will still be a problem sometimes, and when your period turns on after transsexual moments have sent your balls up inside to become ovaries, the ensuing migraine headaches demand still more medical wisdom. Anyway, don't go to hell without garlic in your bag of tricks. Garlic makes somatic ecstacy's throbbing-cock He-LL more survivable. Nism-Dism Communism and its angels should have garlic available and firmly in mind, in addition to readily available flavored prophylactics and New Deal circumcised dongs for Liberty Belles.

Garlic and Onion Salads with Fish and B-vitamins for Life Extension with Rejuvenation
Onions contain benfotiamine, which reduces glucose toxicity [Patents, Books, LEF] and counteracts AGEs (Advanced Glycation End products). Onions also contain quercetin, which has been presented as a telomerase activator in Product B and also as a senolytic drug that forces senescent cells commit apoptosis and vanish. Combined with telomerase-activating garlic using the HDAC inhibitor property of chopped garlic to improve hTERT transcription, onion and garlic salads may be formulated to produce rejuvenation. Salads may be prepared that contain chopped garlic, onions, and olives mixed with sugarless sweetened apple cider mix, apple cider vinegar, extra virgin olive oil, and vinegar-and-oil dressing mix that are very delicious, good for the heart, inhibiting to atherosclerosis, and exhibiting rejuvenating properties. More quercetin-intensive ingredients than onions, such as capers, loveage leaves, and elderberries, should be very useful in formulating tasty and effective salads for rejuvenation and long life. Eliminating the trap of high-temperature cooking of land animals (by taking boiled fish and super B-vitamin pills instead) should then produce very impressive life extension by better controlling homocysteine, glycation, AGEs, atherosclerotic plaque, carcinogens from cooking, and dangerous fatty acids.
 

YouTube(Quercetin): Foods High in Quercetin [Links, Papers, Books]:
Food Quercetin
Content
Remarks
NOW Quercetin with Bromelain 800 mg/cap Contains 800 mg per capsule quercetin, a senolytic drug,
plus 160 mg per cap bromelain, a fibrolytic protease
that attacks atherosclerotic plaque, inhibiting
angina, heart attack, and stroke, also being
a platelet aggregation inhibitor inhibiting blood clot thrombus,
a primary cause of death in patients over 50.
Capers 180 mg/100g 28.349523 grams/oz, 1 oz = 1/16 lb.
3.53 oz per 100 grams, or 0.22 lb per 100 g.
Lovage Leaves 170 mg/100g Loveage is a member of the parsley family.
Elderberries 42 mg/100 g Elderberries contain high amounts of quercetin
Red Onions 19.93 mg/100g .
Onions 19.36 mg/100g We find 25.94 mg of quercetin
per (1/2 cup) onion (small onion).
Green Hot Peppers 15 mg/100g .
Kale 7.71 mg/100g .
Spinach 4.86 mg/100g .
Apple 4.4 mg/100g A large red apple contains about 10 mg of quercetin.
Red Grapes 3.54 mg/100g .
 
Senolytic Drug Footnotes Remarks
BCL-XL inhibitor A1331852 [12] [13] Senolytic.
BCL-XL inhibitor A1155463 [12] [13] Senolytic.
Dasatinib [10] [11] [12] [23] Senolytic.
Fisetin [12] [13] [23] Sometimes fails as a senolytic [13].
FOXO4-DRI [1] [2] [5] NovoPro FOXO4 D-Retro-Inverso(DRI) peptide
expensive.
Garlic [17], [18], [19] Eliminates some senescent cells with AMPK activation. Boosts NK cell activation, Telomerase Activator.
Sex repellant, however.
Navitoclax (ABT263) [12] [15] [16] Senolytic.
Piperlongumine [12] [14] Senolytic.
Quercetin [Apoptosis] [7] [9] [12] [22] [23] [25] [35] Listed Telomerase Activator, Senolytic, reliable.
2 x 1 mg/day to 2 x 1500 mg/day. Video documentary:
500 mg/day for 3 months, to kill senescent cells,
then 150 mg/day maintenance dose [9], [35].
See senolytic NOW Quercetin with Bromelain,
800 mg/cap quercetin, 160 mg/cap bromelain.
Tocotrienols [Apoptosis] [7] [21] [22] [30] [31] [32] [33] [34] Listed Telomerase Activator, Senolytic, perhaps.
40-400 mg/day. Eliminates senescent cells.
May be used with quercetin.

References
[1] Butt MS, Sultan MT, Butt MS, Iqbal J. (2009),
Garlic: nature’s protection against physiological threats,
Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2009 Jun;49(6):538-51. [Papers/Garlic protection, Books]

[2] Ishikawa H, Saeki T, Otani T, et al. (2006),
Aged garlic extract prevents a decline of NK cell number and activity in patients with advanced cancer,
J Nutr 2006 Mar; 136(3 Suppl):816S-20S. [Special/NK Cell boosters].

[3] Svendsen, L., Rattan, S.I., Clark, B.F. (1994),
Testing garlic for possible anti-ageing effects on long-term growth characteristics, morphology and macromolecular synthesis of human fibroblasts in culture [Abstract],
Journal of Ethnopharmacology, (1994 July 8) 43(2):125-33. Reference by [4].

[4] Garlic, Nature's Perfect Prescription, by C. G. Hullquist, page 69.

"Legendary Dr. Albert Schweitzer used garlic for treating typhoid fever and cholera." p.8.
"The horrible Black Plague of the Middle Ages spared those who ate garlic regularly." p.14.
Garlic was shown to be more effective in treating typhoid than penicillin. p. 14.
"Field physicians soaked sterilized sphagnum moss with garlic juice and applied
the preparation to open wounds.
" ... in WW I. p.14.
Garlic appears to be effective against numerous organisms:
__Garlic is effective against Black Plague [Papers, Patents, Books],
_____Garlic is effective against Bubonic Plague [Papers, Patents, Books],
__Garlic is effective against Candida [Papers, Patents, Books],
__Garlic is effective against Cholera [Papers, Patents, Books],
__Garlic is effective against Coccidiodes [Papers, Patents, Books],
__Garlic is effective against Coxsackie [Papers, Patents, Books],
__Garlic is effective against Cryptococcus [Papers, Patents, Books],
__Garlic is effective against Epstein-Barr virus [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF], (tests)
__Garlic is effective against Herpes Simplex [Papers, Patents, Books],
__Garlic is effective against Histoplasma [Papers, Patents, Books],
__Garlic is effective against HIV virus [Papers, Patents, Books],
__Garlic is effective against Influenza B [Papers, Patents, Books],
__Garlic is effective against Leprosy [Papers, Patents, Books],
__Garlic is effective against Sporotrichosis [Papers, Patents, Books], and
__Garlic is effective against Tuberculosis [Papers, Patents, Books],
___"Tuberculosis has been treated by inhaling steam containing garlic oil or garlic juice.
__Garlic is effective against Typhoid [Papers, Patents, Books].

"I'm not in favor of aging for the same reason I'm not in favor of leprosy." - Aubrey de Grey
Note that regular garlic treatments can help prevent aplastic anemia.


[5] Borek C (2006),
Garlic reduces dementia and heart-disease risk,
J Nutr 2006 Mar;136(3 Suppl):810S-812S. [Dementia, Cardiovacular Disease].

[6] Campbell JH, Efendy JL, Smith NJ, Campbell GR (2001),
Molecular basis by which garlic suppresses atherosclerosis [PDF],
J Nutr 2001 Mar;131(3s):1006S-9S. [Atherosclerosis].

[7] Efendy JL, Simmons DL, Campbell GR, Campbell JH (1997),
The effect of the aged garlic extract, ‘Kyolic’, on the development of experimental atherosclerosis,
Atherosclerosis 1997 Jul 11;132(1):37-42. [Aged Garlic Extract, Kyolic].

[8] H.F Lua, C.C Sueb, C.S Yuc, et al (2004),
Diallyl disulfide (DADS) induced apoptosis undergo caspase-3 activity in human bladder cancer T24 cells.
___[Bladder Cancer, Diallyl disulfide, Caspase-3 activated apoptosis].

[9] Oommen S1, Anto RJ, Srinivas G, Karunagaran D (2004),
Allicin (from garlic) induces caspase-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells [Abstract, PDF],
Eur J Pharmacol 2004 Feb 6;485(1-3):97-103.
___[Apoptosis, Caspase-mediated Apoptosis (Patents, Books, LEF)].
___[Links/Allicin, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].
 

"Garlic (Allium sativum) has been used for centuries for treating various ailments, and its consumption is said to reduce cancer risk and its extracts and components effectively block experimentally induced tumors. Allicin, the major component present in freshly crushed garlic, is one of the most biologically active compounds of garlic. We found that allicin inhibited the growth of cancer cells of murine and human origin. Allicin induced the formation of apoptotic bodies [Links], nuclear condensation [Links] and a typical DNA ladder [Links] in cancer cells. Furthermore, activation of caspases -3, -8 and -9 and and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase were induced by allicin. The present results demonstrating allicin-induced apoptosis of cancer cells are novel since allicin has not been shown to induce apoptosis previously. Our results also provide a mechanistic basis for the antiproliferative effects of allicin and partly account for the chemopreventive action of garlic extracts reported by earlier workers."

The paper investigates allicin-induced apoptosis in cervical cancer cells [Apoptosis/Cervial Cancer] and colon cancer cells [Apoptosis/Colon Cancer], and quotes results for diallyl disulfide-induced apoptosis in leukemia [Apoptosis/Leukemia] cells.


[10] Guo, N.L., Lu, D.P., Woods, G.L., Reed E., Zhou, G.Z., Zhang L.B., Waldman, R.H. (1993),
Demonstration of the anti-viral activity of garlic extract against human cytomegalovirus in vitro,
Chin Med J (Engl) (1993 Feb), 106(2):93-6. [Garlic cures CMV (Papers, Books, LEF); CMV]

[11] Moriguchi, T., Takashina, K., Chu, P.J., Saito, H., Nishiyama, N. (1994),
Prolongation of life span and improved learning in the senescence accelerated mouse produced by aged garlic extract [PDF], Biol Pharm Bull (1994 Dec) 17(12):1589-94.
"Chronic feeding of raw garlic causes anemia, weight loss, and failure to grow."


[12] Vinay K Singh, Dinesh K Singh (2008),
Pharmacological Effects of Garlic (Allium sativum L.) [PDF],
ARBS Annual Review of Biomedical Sciences,
Department of Zoology, DDU Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur, U.P., INDIA
Received: 11 September 2007; accepted 21 January 2008.

"The half-life of allicin (concentration of 0.1-0.4 mg/ml) at room temperature is 10 days in 1 mM citric acid (pH 3), 4 days in water, 48 h in methanol or chloroform, 24 h in ethanol, 24 h in hexane and 3 h in ether (Lawson, 1993)".

Evidently, allicin should be freshly prepared from crushed garlic.


[13] Stephen Laifer (2005),
Garlic [OnLine],
Life Extension Magazine April 2005.
___Links/Garlic, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF.

[14] Riddle JM (2001),
Garlic’s history as a medicine,
Paper presented at: American Herbal Products Association International Garlic Symposium, July 31, 2001.
___Garlic History (Links, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension).

[15] Carmia Borek, Ph.D. (2000),
Garlic, the Bountiful Bulb [Online],
Life Extension Magazine January 2000.

[16] Tilli CM, Stavast-Kooy AJ, Vuerstaek JD, et al. (2003),
The garlic-derived organosulfur component ajoene decreases basal cell carcinoma tumor size by inducing apoptosis,
Arch Dermatol Res 2003 Jul;295(3):117-23. [Apoptosis/Garlic, Ajoene (Papers, Patents, Books, LEF), Skin Cancer].

[17] Rana SV , Pal R , Vaiphei K , Singh K (2006),
Garlic hepatotoxicity: safe dose of garlic, [OnLine],
Tropical Gastroenterology : Official Journal of the Digestive Diseases Foundation [2006, 27(1):26-30].
__[Garlic hepatotoxicity (Papers, Patents, Books, LEF); Safe Dose of Garlic (Books, LEF)].
__" 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 g/kg body weight/day of garlic showed significant (P<0.001) deterioration
__in liver function tests (LFT's) after 21, 14 and 7 days respectively.
"
__"Garlic with high dose has the potential ability to induce liver damage and
__low doses (0.1 or 0.25 g / kg body weight/day) are safe doses of garlic.
"
__0.5 g/kg body weight/day dose of garlic showed morphological changes in the liver of one rat after 29 days.
__200 lb. = 90.7185 kg. 0.1 g/kg x 90.7185 kg = 9.7185 grams, 0.25 g/kg x90.7185 kg = 24.29625 g.
__0.5 g/kg x 90.7185 kg = 45.35925 grams.
__The average supermarket clove of garlic weighs about 4-7 grams.
__Exception: A typical garlic clove weighs about 3 grams. - How to Use Garlic Medicinally.
__Confirmation of 3 grams/clove of garlic.
__Google Search: Weight of a garlic clove in grams.
__Google Search: Safe dose of garlic (Papers, Patents, Books, LEF).

[18] Vinay K Singh, Dinesh K Singh (2008),
Pharmacological Effects of Garlic (Allium sativum L.),
ARBS Annual Review of Biomedical Sciences, 7 February 2008.

"Chinese strongly believe that garlic prolongs longevity (Srivastava et al., 1995) and is useful in treating most human diseases, including infections, cancer and heart diseases."


[19] Morbidoni L, Arterburn JM, Young V, Mallins D, Mulrow C, Lawrence V (2001),
Garlic: its history and adverse effects,
J Herbal Pharmacother 2001;1:63-83.
___Garlic History (Links, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension).
___(Links/Adverse Effects of Garlic, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension).

Abstract: "Garlic is a popular herbal alternative therapy. Adverse effects of garlic that have been reported with oral ingestion, inhalation, and topical exposure include smelly breath, body odor, flatulence, esopha-geal and abdominal pain, small intestinal obstruction, contact dermatitis, rhinitis, asthma, bleeding, myocardial infarction, urticaria, angioedema, anaphylaxis, skin blisters, and ulcero-necrotic lesions. Causality of garlic for specific adverse effects is best established for smelly breath, body odor, and allergic reactions; data regarding other adverse effects are primarily based on case reports. The frequency of adverse effects of garlic and whether they vary by particular preparations are not established."


[20] Doug Casey (2006),
The Virus Killer They Don't Want You to Know About,
InvestorsInsight.com, 04-18-2006.

"These are garlic's amazing health benefits:

It kills every virus, bacterium, fungus, and amoeba known to man--without the risk of creating resistance.

It can be used as prophylaxis to prevent stomach ulcers and stomach cancer.

It can prevent and successfully treat anthrax, dysentery, salmonella, staphylococcus, klebsiella, SARS, herpes, etc.

Studies have found that it penetrates and kills cancer cells, without harming the healthy ones.

It inhibits the formation of plaque on artery walls.

It controls insulin levels and helps prevent weight gain.
"


[21] Tariq H. Abdullah, O. Kandil, A. Elkadi, and J. Carter (1988),
Garlic Revisited: Therapeutic for the Major Diseases of Our Times? [PDF],
J Natl Med Assoc 1988 Apr; 80(4): 439–445.

[22] Rahman K (2003),
Garlic and aging: new insights into an old remedy,
Ageing Research Reviews [2003, 2(1):39-56].

"Garlic.... has been used throughout the history of civilization for treating a wide variety of ailments associated with aging. The role of garlic in preventing age-related diseases has been investigated extensively over the last 10-15 years. Garlic has strong antioxidant properties and it has been suggested that garlic can prevent cardiovascular disease, inhibit platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, prevent cancer, diseases associated with cerebral aging, arthritis, cataract formation, and rejuvenate skin, improve blood circulation and energy levels."


[23] Life Extension News (2016),
Aged garlic extract reduces arterial plaque burden,
Life Extension Magazine, May 2016.
___[Links/Aged garlic extract reduces arterial plaque burden, Papers, Patents, Books, Life Extension].
___[Links/Aged garlic extract, Papers, Patents, Books, Life Extension].

[24] * Journal of Nutrition 2016 Jan 13.

[25] There are species of garlic [Images, Books] that have larger cloves than others, so that the dosage [17] here must be qualified. Some bulbs of garlic may consist of as little as 3 cloves per bulb, for instance, while other species of garlic may have typically 8 cloves. Instead of 3-5 cloves/serving, perhaps half a bulb of garlic per serving would be a better way of specifying typical adult dose. I must get down to weighing it, too. Furthermore, the standard dose must be scaled down for children according to the child's bodyweight.

[26] http://www.livestrong.com/article/244977-the-benefits-of-eating-raw-garlic-cloves/ .

[27] K. C. Srivastava, A Bordia and S.K. Verma (1995),
Garlic (Allium sativum) for disease prevention,
South African Journal of Science February 1995.

[28] Lee T.y. and Lam T.H. (1991),
Contact dermatitis due to topical treatment with garlic in Hong Kong,
Contact Derm 24. 193-196.

[29] Lembo G., Balato N., Patrono C .• Auricchio L. and Ayala F. (1991),
Allergic contact dermatitis due 10 garlic (Allium sativum),
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Toxic effects induced by the repeated administration of Allium salivum,
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Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma with associated platelet dysfunction from excessive garlic ingestion: a case report,
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The antimicrobial activity of garlic and onion extracts,
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Enhancement of natural killer cell activity in AIDS with garlic,
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[34] Block, E.(1985),
The chemistry of garlic and onion,
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[35] Ide, N. and Lau, B.H. S. (1997),
Garlic compounds protect vascular endothelial cells from oxidized low density lipoprotein induced injury,
J Pharm Pharmacol 49: 908-911.

[36] Imai, J., Ide, N., Nagae, S., Moriguchi, T.,Matsuura, H. & Itakura, Y. (1994),
Antioxidants and free radical scavenge effects of aged garlic extract and its constituents,
Planta Med 60: 417-420.

[37] Kojima, R., Epstein, C.J. Mizui, T., Carlson, E. & Chan, P.H. (1994),
Protective effects of aged garlic extracts on doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in the mouse,
Nutr Cancer 22:163-173.

[38] Lau, B.H. S. (1989),
Detoxifying, radioprotective and phagocyte-enhancing effects of garlic,
Int Nutr Rev. 9:27-31.

[39] Lawson, L.D., Ransom, D.K. & Hughs (1992),
Inhibition of whole blood platelet aggregation by compounds in garlic clove extracts and commercial garlic products,
Thromb Res 65: 141-156.

[40] Milner, J. A. (1996),
Garlic: Its anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic properties,
Nut Rev 54: S82-S-86.

[41] Moriguchi, T., Saito, H. & Nishyama, N. (1997),
Anti-aging effect of aged garlic extract in the inbred brain atrophy mouse model,
Clin. and Exp. Pharmachol. and Physiol 24: 235-242.

[42] Neil, H.A. et al.
Garlic powder in the treatment of moderate hyperlipidemia: a controlled trial and meta-analysis.

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Antitumorpromoting activity of Allixin, a stress compound produced by garlic,
The Cancer Journal 3:20-21.

[44] Numagami, Y., sato, S., & Onishi, T. (1996),
Nutritional and Health Benefits of Garlic as a Supplement Conference,
Neurochem Int 29: 135-143.

[45] Nutritional and Health Benefits of Garlic as a Supplement Conference,
Newport beach CA (1998). 1-70. Abstracts.

[46] Steiner, M. (1996),
A double blind cross over study in moderately hypercholesterolemic men that compare the effect of Aged Garlic Extract and placebo administration on blood lipids and platelet function,
Am. J. Clin. Nutr 64:866-870.

[47] Steinmetz, K.A., Kushi, L.H., Bostick, R.M., Folsom A.R & Potter, J.D. (1994),
Vegetables, fruit and colon cancer in the Iowa Women's Study,
Am. J. Epidemiol 139:1-5.

[48] Wei, Z. & Lau, B.H.S. (1998),
Garlic inhibits free radical generation and augments antioxidant enzyme activity in vascular endothelial cells,
Nutr. Res 18: 61-70.

[49] William Falloon (2015),
Major Advance In Slowing Aging,
Life Extension Magazine, February 2015.

[50] Guo L, Xie B, Mao Z. (2012),
Autophagy in Premature Senescent Cells Is Activated via AMPK Pathway,
Int J Mol Sci 2012;13(3):3563-82. [AMPK].

[51] Rubinsztein DC, Mariño G, Kroemer G. (2011),
Autophagy and aging,
Cell 2011 Sep 45. 2;146(5):682-95. [AMPK].

[52] Amagase, H., Schaffer, E.M.,& Milner J. (1996),
Dietary components modify the ability of garlic to suppress 7,12,-dimethyl (a anthracene induced DNA adducts),
J. Nut 126:817-824.

[53] Freeman, F. & Kodera, Y. (1995),
Garlic Chemistry: Stability of S-(2-Propenyl) 2-Propene-1-sulfinothioate (Allicin) in blood, solvents and simulated physiological fluids,
J. Agr. and Food Chemistry 43:2332-2338.

[54] Heber D (2004),
Vegetables, fruits and phyto-estrogens in the prevention of diseases,
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[55] Atmaca G (2004),
Antioxidant effects of sulfur-containing amino acids,
Yonsei Med J 2004 Oct 31;45(5):776-88.

[56] Kempaiah RK, Srinivasan K (2004),
Influence of dietary curcumin, capsaicin and garlic on the antioxidant status of red blood cells and the liver in high-fat-fed rats, Ann Nutr Metab 2004 September ;48(5):314-20. [Curcumin, Capsaicin].

[57] Kempaiah RK, Srinivasan K (2004),
Antioxidant status of red blood cells and liver in hypercholesterolemic rats fed hypolipidemic spices,
Int J Vitam Nutr Res 2004 May;74(3):199-208.

[58] Perez-Severiano F, Rodriguez-Perez M, Pedraza-Chaverri J, et al. (2004),
S-Allylcysteine, a garlic-derived antioxidant, ameliorates quinolinic acid-induced neurotoxicity and oxidative damage in rats, Neurochem Int 2004 Dec;45(8):1175-83.

[59] Maldonado PD, Barrera D, Rivero I, et al. (2003),
Antioxidant S-allylcysteine prevents gentamicin-induced oxidative stress and renal damage,
Free Radic Biol Med 2003 Aug 1;35(3):317-24.

[60] Sovova M, Sova P (2004),
Pharmaceutical importance of Allium sativum L. 5. Hypolipemic effects in vitro and in vivo,
Ceska Slov Farm 2004 May;53(3):117-23.

[61] Durak A, Ozturk HS, Olcay E, Guven C (2002),
Effects of garlic extract supplementation on blood lipid and antioxidant parameters and atherosclerotic plaque formation process in cholesterol-fed rabbits,
J Herb Pharmcother 2002;2(2):19-32.

[62] Budoff MJ, Takasu J, Flores FR, et al. (2004),
Inhibiting progression of coronary calcification using aged garlic extract in patients receiving statin therapy: a preliminary study, Prev Med 2004 Nov;39(5):985-91.
__[Links/Coronary Calcification (Papers, Patents, Books, LEF), Vascular Calcification].

[63] Wilburn AJ, King DS, Glisson J, Rockhold RW, Wofford MR (2004),
The natural treatment of hypertension,
J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) 2004 May;6(5):242-8. [Hypertension].

[64] Durak I, Kavutcu M, Aytac B, et al. (2004),
Effects of garlic extract consumption on blood lipid and oxidant/antioxidant parameters in humans with high blood cholesterol, J Nutr Biochem 2004 Jun;15(6):373-7.

[65] Sengupta A, Ghosh S, Bhattacharjee S (2004),
Allium vegetables in cancer prevention: an overview,
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2004 Jul;5(3):237-45. [Cancer].

[66] Hassan HT (2004),
Ajoene (natural garlic compound): a new anti-leukaemia agent for AML therapy,
Leuk Res 2004 Jul;28(7):667-71.
__[Ajoene (Papers, Patents, Books, LEF), Leukemia (Papers, Patents, Books, LEF)].

[67] Ledezma E, Apitz-Castro R, Cardier J (2004),
Apoptotic and anti-adhesion effect of ajoene, a garlic derived compound, on the murine melanoma B16F10 cells: possible role of caspase-3 and the alpha(4)beta(1) integrin,
Cancer Lett 2004 Mar 31;206(1):35-41.
__[Ajoene (Papers, Patents, Books, LEF), Melanoma (Papers, Patents, Books, LEF)].

[68] Tilli CM, Stavast-Kooy AJ, Vuerstaek JD, et al. The garlic-derived organosulfur component ajoene decreases basal cell carcinoma tumor size by inducing apoptosis,
Arch Dermatol Res 2003 Jul;295(3):117-23.
__[Ajoene (Papers, Patents, Books, LEF), Basal Cell Carcinoma (Papers, Patents, Books, LEF)].

[69] Xu B, Monsarrat B, Gairin JE, Girbal-Neuhauser E (2004),
Effect of ajoene, a natural antitumor small molecule, on human 20S proteasome activity in vitro and in human leukemic HL60 cells,
Fundam Clin Pharmacol 2004 Apr;18(2):171-80.
__[Ajoene (Papers, Patents, Books, LEF), Proteasomes, Leukemia].

[70] Lu HF, Sue CC, Yu CS, et al. (2004),
Diallyl disulfide (DADS) induced apoptosis undergo caspase-3 activity in human bladder cancer T24 cells,
Food Chem Toxicol 2004 Oct;42(10):1543-52.

[71] Wu CC, Chung JG, Tsai SJ, Yang JH, Sheen LY (2004),
Differential effects of allyl sulfides from garlic essential oil on cell cycle regulation in human liver tumor cells,
Food Chem Toxicol 2004 Dec;42(12):1937-47. [Liver Cancer].

[72] Sengupta A, Ghosh S, Bhattacharjee S, Das S (2004),
Indian food ingredients and cancer prevention - an experimental evaluation of anticarcinogenic effects of garlic in rat colon,
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2004 Apr;5(2):126-32. [Anticarcinogenic Effects of Garlic (Papers, Patents, Books, LEF)].

[73] Zlotogorski HA, Littner M (2004),
Potential risks, adverse effects and drug interactions associated with herbal medicine in dental patients,
Refuat Hapeh Vehashinayim 2004 Apr;21(2):25-41, 97. [Herbal Medicine (Papers)].

[74] Ciocon JO, Ciocon DG, Galindo DJ (2004),
Dietary supplements in primary care. Botanicals can affect surgical outcomes and follow-up,
Geriatrics 2004 Sep;59(9):20-4.

[75] Vazquez-Prieto MA, Rodriguez Lanzi C, Lembo C, Galmarini CR, Miatello RM (2011),
Garlic and onion attenuates vascular inflammation and oxidative stress in fructose-fed rats,
J Nutr Metab 2011;2011:475216.

[76] Liu CT, Hse H, Lii CK, Chen PS, Sheen LY (2005),
Effects of garlic oil and diallyl trisulfide on glycemic control in diabetic rats,
Eur J Pharmacol 2005 Jun 1;516(2):165-73.

[77] Nahdi A, Hammami I, Kouidhi W, et al. (2010),
Protective effects of crude garlic by reducing iron-mediated oxidative stress, proliferation and autophagy in rats,
J Mol Histol 2010 Oct;41(4-5):233-45.

[78] Harris JC, Cottrell SL, Plummer S, et al. (2001),
Antimicrobial properties of Allium sativum (garlic),
Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2001;57(3):282-6.

[79] Guo NL, Lu DP, Woods GL, et al. (1993),
Demonstration of the anti-viral activity of garlic extract against human cytomegalovirus in vitro,
Chin Med J (Engl) 1993;106(2):93-6.

[80] Kyo E, Uda N, Kasuga S, et al. (2001),
Immunomodulatory effects of aged garlic extract,
J Nutr 2001;131(3s):1075s-9s.

[81] Antimicrobial properties of Allium sativum (garlic),
Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2001 Oct;57(3):282-6.

[82] Amagase H. (1998),
Intake of garlic and its components. Nutritional and Health Benefits of Garlic as a Supplement,
Conference, Newport Beach CA. 4 (Abstract).

[83] Amagase, H.,
Schaffer, E.M.,& Milner J. (1996),
Dietary components modify the ability of garlic to suppress 7, 12,-dimethyl (a anthracene) induced DNA adducts,
J Nut 126:817-824.

[84] Borek C (1995),
Maximize Your Healthspan with Antioxidants,
1995. Keats Publishing, New Canaan, Conn.

[85] Borek, C. (1993),
Molecular mechanisms in cancer induction and prevention,
Environ Health Perspectives 101: 237-245.

[86] Borek, C. (1991),
Free radical processes in multistage carcinogenesis,
Free Rad Res Comm 1991 12 745-750.

[87] Imai, J., Ide, N., Nagae, S., Moriguchi, T.,Matsuura, H. & Itakura, Y. (1994),
Antioxidants and free radical scavenge effects of aged garlic extract and its constituents,
Planta Med (1994) 60: 417-420.

[88] Lau, B.H. S. (1989),
Detoxifying, radioprotective and phagocyte-enhancing effects of garlic,
Int Nutr Rev 9:27-31.

[89] Numagami, Y., sato, S., & Onishi, T. (1996),
Attenuation of rat ischemic brain damage by aged garlic extracts: A possible protecting mechanism as an antioxidants,
Neurochem Int 29: 135-143.

[90] Steinmetz, K.A., Kushi, L.H., Bostick, R.M., Folsom A.R & Potter, J.D. (1994),
Vegetables, fruit and colon cancer in the Iowa Women's Study,
Am J Epidemiol 139:1-5.
 


Garlic Searches:
Garlic promotes HDL cholesterol and lowers total cholesterol.

Viral Cures [Viral Disease Tables, Images, Papers, Books; Wikipedia/Viral disease; LEF/viral cures]
Animal Virus Family Typical Member Genome Size (kbp) Cures showing antiviral activity
RNA Genomes @
(replicate within
the cytoplasm)
. . .
Togaviruses Rubella virus
(
German measles)
12 Rubella Virus Vaccine
Enviroxime [Papers, Patents] (REF)
Flaviviruses Yellow fever virus 10 Garlic 5-8 cloves [Encyclopedia]
Fenugreek seed [Index]
Paramyxoviruses Measles virus 16-20 Calcium-spirulan [Links, Ref]
Orthomyxoviruses Influenza virus (flu) 14 Black Elderberry [Images],
Curcumin [Article, Index, Images]
Garlic [Encyclopedia, Article, Images]
NAC [Index, Images]
_with green tea
_and arginine (1.5 g).
_Effective for bird flu.
Reishi mushroom [Images]
Retroviruses HIV virus [Encyclopedia] 9 Alpha Lipoic Acid [Index, Images],
Calcium-spirulan [Links, Ref],
Carnosol [Links, Rosemary],
Catuaba [Images],
Cinnamon (Bark) [Index, Images],
Curcumin [Article, Index, Images],
EGCG [Index, Images],
Gallic acid [Index, Images],
Garlic [Encyclopedia, Images],
Glycyrrhizin [Index, Ref, Images],
Green Tea [Index, Images],
Hyssop [Images],
Lemon Balm extract [Images],
Maitake Mushroom [Index],
Olive Leaf Extract [Images],
Peppermint extracts [Images]
Pomegranate [Images, Juice],
Reishi mushroom [Images]
Rooibos Tea [Images],
Sage [Images],
Self-heal [Images],
Shiitake Mushrooms
__[Ref, Images],
Tannic acid [Images],
Theaflavin [Index, Images]
Picornaviruses Enterovirus
Coxsackie virus family
___[Papers, Patents]
7.3-7.4 Garlic [Encyclopedia]
Picornaviruses Poliovirus 7-8 Enviroxime [Papers, Patents] (REF)
Garlic [Encyclopedia]
Picornaviruses Rhinovirus
(common cold)
7.152 Garlic [Encyclopedia]
Licorice [Glycyrrhiza]
Picornaviruses Hepatitus A virus 7.478 Glycyrrhizin [Index, Ref, Images]
Hepadnaviruses Hepatitus C virus
___Liver Cancer
9.6 Glycyrrhizin [Index, Ref, Images]
St. John's Wort,
__Hypericin,
__Psuedohypericin.
DNA Genomes @
(replicate within
the nucleus)
. . .
Hepadnaviruses Hepatitus B virus
___Liver Cancer
32 Curcumin [Article, Index],
Glycyrrhizin [Index, Ref, Images]
Reishi mushroom [Images]
Papovaviruses HPV virus [Index]
__Genital Warts
__Cervical cancer
5-8 Curcumin [Index, Images],
Garlic [Article, Encyclopedia]
Berberine [Images, List]
Reishi mushroom (HPV 16 E6)
Shiitake mushrooms (Index)
___[LEF, Ref, Papers, Patents],
___AHCC [Papers, Ref, LEF].
Adenoviruses [Index] Adenovirus 36 Curcumin [Article, Index, Images]
Herpesviruses [Index] Herpes Simplex Virus
HSV (HSV-1, HSV-2)
120-200 Acyclovir [Images],
Basil [Index, Images],
Berberine [Index, Images]
Clove Oil [Images],
Eugenol [Index, Images]
Garlic [Encyclopedia, Ref],
Glycyrrhiza [Index, Images]
Lemon Balm [Index, Images]
Licorice [Index, Images]
Reishi mushroom [Images]
Scinaia [Images, Extract]
Herpesviruses [Index] Cytomegalovirus (CMV) @
___Glioma,
___Glioblastoma multiforme
235 Garlic [Encyclopedia, Ref, Images],
Glycyrrhizin [Index, Ref, Images],
Natural Killer cell boosters,
___AHCC,
___Alpha Lipoic Acid,
___Arabinoxylin,
___Astragalus,
___Beta carotene,
___Chronic resistance exercise,
___Cistanche,
___Curcumin,
___Garlic,
___Genistein,
___Ginseng,
___Lentinan,
___Mistletoe,
___Modified arabinoxylan
______rice bran
,
___N-Acetylcysteine,
___Resveratrol,
___Selenium,
___Shiitake Mushrooms,
___Vitamin B12
______(Methylcobalmin),
___Vitamin C,
___Vitamin D3,
___Vitamin E,
___Zinc,
Prescription Drugs:
__Valganciclovir
St. John's Wort [Index, Ref]
_Hypericin from St.John's Wort.
Herpesviruses [Index] Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)
(Herpesvirus 4 (HHV-4))
___Mononucleosis,
___Lymphoma,
____Hodgkins lymphoma,
____Burkitts lymphoma,
___gastric cancer, and
___nasopharyngeal
______carcinoma
.
? Garlic [Encyclopedia, Ref, Images],
Fucoidan [Index, Images],
Echinacea [Index, Images, 900 mg/day],
Acyclovir [Images],
Valcyclovir [Images].
Poxviruses Vaccinia virus 130-280 Garlic [Encyclopedia, Ref],
Allicin [Ref, Links, Images]

Carcinogenic Viral pathogens [Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension] may cause cancer (although 80% of cancers are not from viruses):
___Adenovirus, a tumor provirus (DNA genome 36 kbp) [Micklos, et.al, DNA Science, p.225].
_____Adenovirus causes only flu-like symptoms in humans, but develops malignancies in mice.
___Epstein-Barr virus can cause lymphoma.
___Hepatitis B virus (DNA genome 3 kb) can cause liver cancer in 10-20% of chronic infections,
___Hepatitis C virus (RNA genome 10 kb) can cause liver cancer in 5% of chronic infections,
___HTLV-1 virus can cause lymphoma or adult T-cell leukemia via the viral gene tax.
___Herpes viruses can cause Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal cancer, and Kaposi's sarcoma.
___HIV virus leads to higher rates of lymphomas and Kaposi's sarcoma via immunosuppression.
___Papilloma virus [Images] (DNA genome 8 kb) can cause cervical cancer.
___Polyomavirus, a tumor provirus, (DNA genome 5292 bp).
___Rabbit fibroma virus.
___Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) (DNA genome 60 kbp), a chicken tumor provirus.
___Simian virus 40 (SV40), a provirus, (DNA genome 5243 bp).
___T-cell lymphotropic virus can cause lymphoma.
___Retroviruses (RNA-genome 9-10 kb) can cause adult T-cell leukemia [Encyclopedia].
___C-myc, if translocated by viral infection, may become unregulated and carcinogenic.
___Viral oncoproteins [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books] can cause cancer.
About 20% of human cancers are virus-induced, including anogenital cancers (papilloma viruses), liver cancer (hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus) and some lymphomas (Epstein-Barr virus and T-cell lymphotropic virus). 

Jim Green has left an In Memory comment for Leslie Bills.
Jul 09, 2019 at 4:33 PM

Heart Attack (Congestive Heart Failure)
[Index, Links, Images, Video, Video/What happens; Video/Heart Disease and Heart Attacks; 3D Animation, Papers, Patents, Books, LibCong, LifeExtension, Amazon, The Heart Scan Blog; Amyloidosis, Angina, Arjuna, Arteriosclerosis, Atherosclerosis, Atherosclerotic Plaque, Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease, Cholesterol, C-reactive protein, Fats, Fibrinogen, Fibrolytic Proteases, Hawthorn, Homocysteine, Ischemia-Reperfusion Injuries, LDL Peroxidation, Lipid Peroxidation, Lycopene, Magnesium, Nattokinase, Oats, Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors, Serrapeptase, Smoking, Taurine, Thrombolytic Drugs, Uric Acid, Vascular Diseases, Vitamin D, Vitamin K2; Anemia anemia[1]] [73].

Cigarette smoking [Essay/Smoking, Index] is often seen in connection with heart attack. Smoking a pack of cigarettes a day more than doubles the risk of heart attack. The heart attack usually takes place when a blood clot forms in a small cardiac vessel feeding heart muscle narrowed by atherosclerotic plaque, typically after a piece of plaque breaks off in the progressively narrowing artery, jamming it and clotting up with an embolism after floating downstream. Myocardial infarction follows, killing heart cells near the artery deprived of oxygen.

Aspirin is recommended immediately to thin the blood and break up the clot. A more effective clot-busting injection may be used. Anticlotting agents and other blood thinners such as nitroglycerin may be taken. Fancy anticoagulants including warfarin (calcifies soft tissues like a sneak attack on warheads), heparins, fondaparinux or dabigatran work by blocking vitamin K1 or inactivating other clotting factors in the blood. See Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors and Thrombolytic Drugs. Antiplatelet thromboxane blockers such as aspirin, EPA and DHA from fish oil, dipyridamole, ticlopidine and clopidogrel prevent clotting by preventing thromboxane from rounding up clotting cells in the blood. Foods and nutraceuticals with blood-thinning effect [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF] (usually platelet aggregation inhibitors) include alfalfa, avocado, beer, bilberry, More…color="#0066cc">cat's claw, celery, coQ10, cranberries, fish oil, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, ginseng, grapefruit, green tea, horse chestnut, licorice, magnesium, niacin, onion, papaya, pomegranate, soybean, St. John’s wort, turmeric, and wheatgrass.

A cardiac stent [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF; survival] may be inserted by a surgeon in the vessel to widen the passage narrowed by atherosclerotic plaque. This is sometimes done to relieve the pain associated with Angina Pectoris [Encyclopedia] from plaque-narrowed vessels. Today, one uses a fibrolytic protease such as serrapeptase used by silkworms to devour their coccoons to wipe out atherosclerotic plaque, or perhaps nattokinase, also a fibrolytic protease used to treat amyloidosis plaques.

Perhaps ibuprofen may be used to reduce heart attack pain.

See Hypertension: For age greater than 50 years, hypertension exists when the systolic blood pressure is greater than 140 mm Hg or when the diastolic blood pressure is greater than 90 mm Hg, that is, when blood pressure is more than 140/90 mmHg. Normal blood pressure is less than 120/80 mmHg. See Wikipedia for standard medical treatments for hypertension and Links/hypertension treatment. Drugs typically used in medicine to treat hypertension include: Thiazide diuretics "water pills" to reduce blood volume, for age 80 or more perhaps indapamide (Lozol); Beta blockers to reduce the workload on the heart and open blood vessels, causing the heart to beat slower and with less force; Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to help relax blood vessels; Angiotensin II receptor blockers to relax blood vessels; Calcium channel blockers to relax the muscles of the blood vessels; Renin inhibitors such as Aliskiren (Tekturna), which slows down the production of renin, a kidney enzyme that increases blood pressure. Medicine for further therapy includes Alpha blockers to reduce nerve impulses to blood vessels, Alpha-beta blockers to slow the heartbeat in order to reduce the amount of blood that must be pumped through the vessels, Central-acting agents that prevent the brain from signaling to increase heart rate and narrow your blood vessels, and Vasodilators [Index]. From the section on Helicases: Hypertension may be alleviated by supplementation with magnesium or taurine.

Optimal Cardiac Defense
EPA (Eicosapentanoic acid) and DHA (Docosahexaenoic acid) found in fish oil suppress key proinflammatory cellular signaling molecules, including:

(1) Interleukin 1-beta, targeted by DHA, upregulates the expression of adhesion factors in endothelial cells contributing to atherosclerosis. It is in the optimal range when IL-1-beta < 2.9 pg/mL.
(2) Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an enzyme involved in prostaglandin production targeted by DHA and EPA, contributes to chronic inflammation and cardiovascular disease. COX-2 inhibitors include ibupofen and ginger and prescription drugs like Vioxx. Oleocanthol from extra virgin olive oil inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2 cyclooxygenases. However, inhibiting COX-2 enzymes can elevate levels of thromboxane A2 and leukotriene B4, so that continued use of COX-2 inhibitors may be dangerous.
(3) Leukotriene B4 (synthesized from arachidonic acid and 5-lipooxygenase) and displaced from cells by DHA, induces vascular adhesion and inflammation of arterial and cardiac tissues.
(4) TNF-alpha contributes to systemic inflammation (blunted by DHA and EPA) and stimulates the production of the vasoconstrictive endothelin-1, which can induce high blood pressure and long-term vascular damage. TNF-alpha concentrations should satisfy < 8.1 pg/mL. See vasodilators and TNF-alpha inhibitors.
(5) Thromboxane (synthesized from omega-6 fatty acids [Index]) elevates blood pressure and is involved in blood clot formation, which may lead to fatal clots. Thomboxane activity is suppressed by EPA and DHA.

"People with total omega-3 levels above 6.1% in their blood had a compelling 90% reduction in risk of sudden cardiac death [Images] compared to those whose omega-3s were 4.3% or less of their fatty acids." A 70% reduction in risk of death from heart attack [Images] was observed for people with EPA and DHA values of 4.6% or greater, when compared with those whose total values were less than 3.5%. 2000 mg to 4000 mg of fish oil per day may be required to obtain optimal cardiac defense [Papers, Patents, Books]. (See Julius Goepp, MD, "Optimize Your Omega-3 Status", Life Extension Magazine, May 2010). "Congestive heart failure responds favorably to taurine therapy." (Life Extension, Taurine), [36s] (k). In physical therapy, 3-5 grams of taurine [Encyclopedia, Images] is taken 30 minutes before exercise (9) and again just after.

Hawthorn extracts at 80 mg - 180 mg twice daily, and Arjuna bark powder at 500 mg every 8 hours are useful in preventing and reversing heart failures. Hawthorn extracts are termed cardiotonic because of their ability to improve heart muscle tone. Hawthorn extracts can improve coronary blood flow up to 70% and prevent ischemia-reperfusion injuries, reducing mortality rate in cardiac ischemia. Hawthorn extract substantially reduces arrhythmias that may follow or accompany ischemia and reperfusion, and pre-treatment prior to ischemia-reperfusion very substantially reduces the prevalence of deadly cardiac arrhythmias [Papers, Patents, Books] manifesting themselves as ventricular fillibration [Papers, Patents, Books] and heart flutter [Papers, Patents, Books].

Arjuna extracts [Encyclopedia] and extra virgin olive oil reduce total and LDL cholesterol, reduce trigycerides, and elevate HDL cholesterol, limiting atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta and improving endothelial function. Extra virgin olive oil and tomato soup lycopene reduce LDL peroxidation leading to atherosclerosis and consequently elevated hypertension. Two tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil in tomato soup makes antioxidant lycopene more bioavailable. See Silas Hoffman (2013), Novel Support for Chronic Heart Failure, Arrhythmia and Coronary Artery Blockage, Life Extension Magazine, Feb 2013. Cardiovascular problems may be reduced by taking green coffee bean extract at 350 mg before meals to reduce consequent elevated glucose. See William Falloon (2013), Preparing Your Body to Eat, Life Extension Magazine, Feb 2013.

Taurine Reduces Mortality Due to Congestive Heart Failure [Taurine].
"Congestive heart failure responds favorably to taurine therapy." (Life Extension), [36s] (k), [8], [9]. In animal studies, taurine reduced mortality due to heart failure by 80% [Ian Macleavy, 2013, LEF]. Taurine is abundant in fish.

References
[1] William Faloon (2009),
How to Circumvent 17 Independent Heart Attack Risk Factors,
Life Extension Magazine May 2009. [Heart Attack, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF; Fats, Oils].

(1) Excess LDL cholesterol.
___[Arjuna, Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Hawthorn, Niacin, Oats, Pantethine, Pomegranate, Tocotrienols].
(2) Excess cholesterol. [Niacin, Oats, Beta Glucan, Fiber]. Saturated fats produce high total cholesterol.
(3) Low HDL cholesterol. [Arjuna, Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Pomegranate].
(4) Excess glucose. [Glycation, Obesity; Cinnamon, Caloric Restriction, Vitamin B1, Benfotiamine (Onions)].
___Fructose x10 worse glycation.
(5) Excess homocysteine. [Homocysteine Blockers: Folic Acid, Vitamin B6, Vitamin B12; Super B-vitamin pills].
(6) Excess C-Reactive Protein [Obesity, Caloric Restriction, Fish Oil, Krill Oil, Vitamin C, Exercise, Testosterone].
(7) Insufficient Vitamin D. [Vitamin D, sources, supplements].
(8) Insufficient Vitamin K. [Vitamin K2 (from natto or hard cheeses, deflects vascular calcification), Vitamin K1].
(9) Elevated Triglycerides (Fats). [Arjuna, Extra Virgin Olive Oil]. High triglycerides produce high total cholesterol.
(10) Low Blood EPA/DHA [Fish Oil]. Fish oil is a platelet aggregation inhibitor.
(11) Low Testosterone [DHEA, Exercise, Fenugreek, Forskolin, Longjack, Pomegranate Seed Oil, Tribulus].
(12) Excess Estrogen (in Men) [Estrogen Protection (DIM), Broccoli, Indole-3-Carbinol, Pomegranate Seed Oil].
(13) Excess Insulin [Lower sugar consumption, Obesity]
(14) Nitric Oxide Deficit [Arginine, Citrulline, Pomegranate] risk factor.
(15) Excess Fibrinogen [Nattokinase, Fish Oil, Vitamin C, Pine bark proanthocyanidins, Bromelain, Garlic].
(16) Hypertension risk factor
____[Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Fish Oil, Magnesium, Taurine, Lipoic Acid, Vitamin D, Melatonin, Cortisol Inhibitors].
(17) Oxidized LDL cholesterol [Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Hawthorn, Lycopene, Pomegranate] risk factor.
(18) Magnesium Deficiency (a cause of sudden death)
____[Leads to hypertension, clots and embolisms: magnesium oxide, tri-magnesium citrate, magnesium supplements].
(19) Iron, typically from beef, aggravates inflammation. Chelate iron.
_____High levels of iron promote oxidation of LDL in damaged endothelial tissues.


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[19] William Faloon (2015),
Live Longer By Changing How You Cook!,
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___[Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].
___ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].
___Serious adverse consequences can result from a x2 overdose. Sensitive stuff.
___Can dissolve gallstones and atherosclerotic plaque. Natually occurring. See Ursodiol.
___RELATED: LEF search on arterial plaque dissolution produces:
___Serrapeptase 10 mg 90 capsules: Solaray, Item# 28548.(0) Retail Price: $24.99.
_____Serrapeptase [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF]. Silkworm's coccoon dissolving enzyme.
_______Serrapeptase for arterial plaque dissolution [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].
_______Serrapeptase: The natural anti-inflammatory, Life Extension Magazine, September 2003.

[36] Nadia Mason (2014),
Focus on Serrapeptase [Online],
Discover Nutrition November 1, 2014.

" Because of its ability to dissolve fibrin, serrapeptase has also been used to dissolve arterial plaque, fibrous blockages in clogged or hardened arteries. As serrapeptase only dissolves dead or damaged tissue, this could enable the dissolution of harmful atherosclerotic plaques without causing any harm to the inside of the arteries. Studies of serrapeptase supplementation have found positive benefits with a dosage of around 10mg, taken after meals three times daily. No long-term studies of this supplement have yet been conducted, although studies to date suggest that supplementation for a period of 4 weeks seems safe (1,2)."

___Serrapeptase 10 mg 90 capsules: Solaray, Item# 28548.(0) Retail Price: $24.99.
_____Serrapeptase [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF]. Silkworm's coccoon dissolving enzyme.
_______Serrapeptase for arterial plaque dissolution [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].
_______Serrapeptase: The natural anti-inflammatory, Life Extension Magazine, September 2003.

[37] Dr. H A Nieper - Germany (),
Silk Worm Enzymes For Carotid Artery Blockage [OnLine].
"Serapeptase is a stronger saseinolytic (fibrinolytic) agent than any other known alkaline or neutral protease such as bromelain or pronase."
___See Serapeptase as a fibrinolytic agent [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].
___Bromelain as a fibrinolytic agent [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF; Index/Bromelain].
___Pronase as a fibrinolytic agent [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].

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Fibrinolytic compositions comprising bromelain and nattokinase for the prevention and treatment of phlebothrombotic states, WO 2014079689 A1, May 30, 2014.

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Surprising Factor Behind Sudden Cardiac Arrest,
Life Extension Magazine June 2015. [Testosterone, Magnesium].
 

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Testosterone replacement therapy faces FDA scrutiny,
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Greatest Threat to Longevity,
Life Extension Magazine January 2017. [Thrombosis, Thrombolytic Drugs].
[Arterial thrombosis (Typical disorders: Heart Attack, Ischemic Stroke);
Venous thrombosis (Typical Disorders: Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary Embolism)].

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[64] Michael Downey (2017),
Arterial Plaque Rupture,
Life Extension Magazine May 2017.
___Gotu Kola improves the stability of soft atherosclerotic plaque
___by improving the expression of collagen.
___French maritime pine bark extract (150 mg) plus Gotu Kola (225 mg) improves soft plaque stability best.

[65] Luzzi R, Belcaro G, Ippolito E (2016),
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[68] William Faloon (2017),
Should You Eat Before a Blood Test?,
Life Extension Magazine May 2017.
"Postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (such as VLDL cholesterol)" instigate "coronary plaque, carotid plaque, and aneurysms of the aorta."

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[75] William Faloon (2002),
Dying From Neglect [OnLine],
Life Extension Magazine March 2002. [Encyclopedia, Anemia (Papers, Patents, Books, LEF)].

__"24% to 40% of hospitalized patients over age 65 are anemic [15]".
__"...Blood deficient individuals have high mortality rates from diseases
__such as heart failure, stroke and cancer."

__"In (heart attack) patients with very low hematocrit (below 24%),
__transfusion was associated with a 64% reduction in mortality.
"
__"Aging itself predisposes people to anemia."
__"Stroke was the most common disease associated with anemia."
__"The increased risk of mortality in cancer patients who were anemic was an astounding 65%!"
__"Anemia sharply increases the risk that a heart attack victim will die within 30 days."

Note that aplastic anemia often proceeds from an STD viral infection such as CMV, or other infections such as a candida yeast infection, all of them treatable with garlic.
 

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___Apolipoprotein B [Images, Papers, Patents, Books; Measuring Apolipoprotein B (Patents, Books)].
___Apolipoprotein B is a measure of all the cholesterol that is not HDL cholesterol.

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[90] Nadia Mason (2014),
Focus on Serrapeptase [Online],
Discover Nutrition November 1, 2014.

" Because of its ability to dissolve fibrin, serrapeptase has also been used to dissolve arterial plaque, fibrous blockages in clogged or hardened arteries. As serrapeptase only dissolves dead or damaged tissue, this could enable the dissolution of harmful atherosclerotic plaques without causing any harm to the inside of the arteries. Studies of serrapeptase supplementation have found positive benefits with a dosage of around 10mg, taken after meals three times daily. No long-term studies of this supplement have yet been conducted, although studies to date suggest that supplementation for a period of 4 weeks seems safe (1,2)."

___Serrapeptase 10 mg 90 capsules: Solaray, Item# 28548.(0) Retail Price: $24.99.
_____Serrapeptase [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF]. Silkworm's coccoon dissolving enzyme.
_______Serrapeptase for arterial plaque dissolution [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].
_______Serrapeptase: The natural anti-inflammatory, Life Extension Magazine, September 2003.
[91] Dr. H A Nieper - Germany (),
Silk Worm Enzymes For Carotid Artery Blockage [OnLine].
"Serapeptase is a stronger saseinolytic (fibrinolytic) agent than any other known alkaline or neutral protease such as bromelain or pronase."
___See Serapeptase as a fibrinolytic agent [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].
___Bromelain as a fibrinolytic agent [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF; Index/Bromelain].
___Pronase as a fibrinolytic agent [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].
[92] Serrapeptase: The natural anti-inflammatory, Life Extension Magazine, September 2003.
Serrapeptase [Fibrolytic Proteases; Links/Serrapeptase, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF; Atherosclerosis].

Jim Green has left an In Memory comment for Joseph Damilini.
Jul 09, 2019 at 4:33 PM

Glioma
[Index, CMV, Viral Cures, Brain Cancer, Brain Cancer/Glioma, Wikipedia/Glioma, Links, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books; Images/glial cells, Images/glioma cancer cells, Images/glioblastoma; Links/Glioblastoma multiforme pathway, Images, Video, Qiagen/Glioblastoma multiforme pathway; Rare Diseases/Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma, Links/Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books; Cancer; Carcinogens, Anticancer Nutraceuticals, Apoptosis, Apoptosis Inducers, Apoptosis Inducers/Glioma; Telomerase Inhibitors; Anticancer Telomerase Activators; Metastasis, NFkB, NFkB Inhibitors, Angiogenesis Inhibitors, Natural Killer cell boosters, Viral Cures].

Note that the HDAC inhibitors sulforaphane and sodium 4-phenylbutyrate have been used to induce apoptosis in glioma cancer cells. It may be true that other HDAC inhibitors [2] such as alpha lipoic acid and acetyl L-carnitine, often used to improve levels of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), also have some effect against glioma.

Furthermore, capsaicin from red hot chili peppers suppresses tumors of the glioma type, and also induces apoptosis in glioma cancer cells. DHA induces apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells, and also protects normal neural cells from apoptosis. Curcumin-induced histone hypoacetylation enhances caspase-3-dependent glioma cell death and neurogenesis of neural progenitor cells [5].
 

Glioma Cancer cell apoptosis inducers: [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension]
___Capsaicin suppresses tumors of the glioma type [3].
___Curcumin-induced histone hypoacetylation enhances caspase-3-dependent glioma cell death [5].
___DHA induces apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells, also protects normal neural cells from apoptosis.
___Sodium 4-Phenylbutyrate has been used to induce apoptosis in glioma cancer cells.
___Sulforaphane, also an HDAC inhibitor [2], induces apoptosis in glioma cells [1].


See Lisa Antone (2014), Common Virus Links to Deadly Brain Cancer More…with preamble by William Faloon, Life Extension Magazine, February 2014 [4]. According the the article, gliomablastoma multiforme is associated with CMV, or cytomegalovirus. Note from Virology (Viral Cures) that CMV may be treated with garlic or glycyrrhizin or prescription drugs. Researchers have suggested the relatively expensive valganciclovir for CMV treatment. Hypericin from St. John's Wort also cures CMV. Natural Killer cell boosters are also helpful in CMV therapy.
 

Animal Virus Family Typical Member Genome Size (kbp) Cures showing antiviral activity
DNA Genomes @
(replicate within
the nucleus)
. . .
Herpesviruses [Index] Cytomegalovirus (CMV) @
___Glioma,
___Glioblastoma multiforme
235 Garlic [Encyc, Ref, Images],
Glycyrrhizin [Index, Ref, Images],
Natural Killer cell boosters,
___AHCC,
___Alpha Lipoic Acid,
___Arabinoxylin,
___Astragalus,
___Beta carotene,
___Chronic resistance exercise,
___Cistanche,
___Curcumin,
___Garlic,
___Genistein,
___Ginseng,
___Lentinan,
___Mistletoe,
___Modified arabinoxylan
______rice bran
,
___N-Acetylcysteine,
___Resveratrol,
___Selenium,
___Shiitake Mushrooms,
___Vitamin B12
______(Methylcobalmin),
___Vitamin C,
___Vitamin D3,
___Vitamin E,
___Zinc,
Prescription Drugs:
__Valganciclovir
St. John's Wort [Index, Ref]
_Hypericin from St.John's Wort.


See Brain Cancer, Brain Cancer/Glioma and Apoptosis/Glioma for more details.

References
[1] Karmakar S, Weinberg MS, Banik NL, Patel SJ, Ray SK (2006),
Activation of multiple molecular mechanisms for apoptosis in human malignant glioblastoma T98G and U87MG cells treated with sulforaphane,
Neuroscience 2006;141:1265–80. [Glioma, Brain Cancer, Sulforaphane].

[2] Myzak MC, Karplus PA, Chung FL, Dashwood RH (2004),
A novel mechanism of chemoprotection by sulforaphane: inhibition of histone deacetylase,
Cancer Res 2004;64:5767–74. [Sulforaphane, HDAC inhibitors].

[3] Aggarwal BB, et al (2008),
Potential of Spice-Derived Phytochemicals for Cancer Prevention,
Planta Med 2008; 74: 1560–1569.

"...The potential of turmeric (curcumin), red chilli (capsaicin), cloves (eugenol), ginger (zerumbone), fennel (anethole), kokum (gambogic acid), fenugreek (diosgenin), and black cumin (thymoquinone) in cancer prevention has been established."

"...Chronic inflammation is a low level inflammation that can persist over 20–30 years; thus eventually leading to cancer. Perhaps the best-known markers of chronic inflammation include inflammatory cytokines [such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), receptor activator for nuclear factor ? B ligand (RANKL), interleukins (IL-1, IL-6, IL-8)] and chemokines, inflammatory enzymes [cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)], adhesion molecules [intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)], vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1), endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1), and certain growth factors such as epidermal growth factor (EGF). Interestingly, all the mediators of inflammation are primarily regulated by two different transcription factors, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)."


[4] Lisa Antone (2014),
Common Virus Links to Deadly Brain Cancer,
with preamble by William Faloon, Life Extension Magazine, February 2014.

[5] Kang SK, Cha SH, Jeon HG (2006),
Curcumin-induced histone hypoacetylation enhances caspase-3-dependent glioma cell death and neurogenesis of neural progenitor cells, Stem Cells Dev 2006;15(2):165-74. [Curcumin, Apoptosis Inducers/Curcumin, Apoptosis/Glioma].

[6] Sun L, Yoshii Y, Miyagi K, Ishida A. (1999),
Proliferation inhibition of glioma cells by vitamin K2,
No Shinkei Geka 1999 Feb;27(2):119-25. [Vitamin K2].

[7] Castriconi R, Daga A, Dondero A, et al. (2009),
NK cells recognize and kill human glioblastoma cells with stem cell-like properties,
J Immunol 2009 Mar 15;182(6):3530-9. [NK cells, NK Cell Activators]

[8] Fecci PE, Mitchell DA, Whitesides JF, et al. (2006),
Increased regulatory T-cell fraction amidst a diminished CD4 compartment explains cellular immune defects in patients with malignant glioma,
Cancer Res 2006 Mar 23. 15;66(6):3294-302.

[9] Roomi MW, Kalinovsky T, Rath M, et al. (2017),
Modulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion by cytokines, inducers and inhibitors in human glioblastoma T-98G cells,
Oncol Rep 2017;37(3):1907-13. [Green Tea, Brain Cancer].
 

Jim Green has left an In Memory comment for Leslie Bills.
Jul 09, 2019 at 4:33 PM

Atherosclerosis
[Wikipedia, Links/Atherosclerosis, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension, LibCong; [1], [2];
Links/Foods most likely to produce atherosclerosis, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books;
Wikipedia/Atherogenesis, Links, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books;
Links/Atherogenic Lipoproteins, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension;
The apolipoprotein B (apo B) blood test [Patents, Books, LEF] [310];
The LDL-P test [Patents, Books, LEF] [310];
Links/Endothelial dysfunction, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension;
The History of Atherosclerosis and Its Treatment, Papers, Patents, Books;
Arginine, Arjuna, Atherosclerotic Plaque; Arteriosclerosis; Blood Tests; Cardiology; Cardiovascular Disease; Cholesterol, CoQ10 and atheroslerosis, CoQ10, Dementia, Endothelial Cells, Endothelial Dysfunction, Endothelial Senescence, Fats, Fibrolytic Proteases, Hawthorn, Heart Attack; Homocysteine, LDL peroxidation, Lipoprotein phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), Lycopene, Macular Degeneration; Nitric Oxide; Oxidative Stress, Serrapeptase, Stroke, Testosterone, Ubiquinol, Vascular Calcification, Vitamin K2].

"Atherosclerosis, an inflammatory process in arterial walls, can lead to formation of plaques, whose rupture can lead to thrombus formation, obstruction of vessels (thrombosis), reduction of the blood flow (ischemia), cell death in the tissue fed by the occluded vessel, and depending on the affected vessel, to myocardial infarction or stroke." [3], More…color="#0066cc">[4]. Atherosclerosis provides the foundation for angina and many a heart attack [96] or stroke. Note that thrombus formation [Papers, Patents] often occurs in varicose veins, often producing thrombophlebitis that is treated with thrombolytic drugs, anticoagulants, and elastic bandage wraps.

Homocysteine
Homocysteine levels are elevated to toxic levels due to synthesis from dietary methionine in red meat and poultry, and are aggravated due to a decline with age in detoxifying methylation. Homocysteine produces oxidant damage to the arterial lining allowing the formation of atherosclerotic plaque, so that homocysteine blockers are primary in atherosclerosis prevention. A homocysteine blocker including B-vitamins vitamin B6, vitamin B12, and folic acid with TMG (trimethylglycine), a "super B-vitamin pill", is fundamental in preventing atherosclerosis by supporting detoxifying methylation of homocysteine. Taking v vitamin B12 (found in meat, eggs, and dairy products) from Super B-vitamin pills allows man to avoid meat, taking fish for taurine and avoiding homocysteine problems and Alzheimer's Disease from vitamin B12-deficiency.

Oxidized LDL Cholesterol
LDL peroxidation produces similar damage to the arterial wall leading to the development of atherosclerotic plaque. High blood sugar from diabetes can produce glycoxidation of LDL cholesterol leading to the formation of foam cells that are the hallmark of atherosclerosis [297]. Oxidized LDL is a common cause of arterial occlusion, and is now measurable using available Life Extension blood tests. Oxidized LDL is easily prevented by bowls of tomato soup containing the powerful antioxidant lycopene plus two tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil, which makes lycopene more bioavailable, elevates beneficial HDL cholesterol, lowers LDL cholesterol, and reduces triglycerides. LDL cholesterol is lowered with oats, which contain beta glucan soluble fiber, an active agent in medicinal mushrooms. Pomegranate, a powerful antioxidant, lowers oxidized LDL cholesterol and also elevates HDL cholesterol while lowering LDL cholesterol. Hawthorn and Arjuna also lower the LDL/HDL ratio.

High LDL/HDL ratio
Atherosclerotic plaque also forms less readily when the blood lipid profile features a low LDL/HDL ratio of low density lipoprotein to high density lipoprotein, a typical result of regular exercise and a suitably low-fat, low-cholesterol diet. Flax seed lignans reduce atherosclerosis and lower Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL), improving overall cariovascular protection. (Dale Kiefer, LifeExtension/Lignans, April 2010, p.86.) See Links/Drug and Nutraceutical treatment of atherosclerosis and LifeExtension/Endothelial Defense. Atherosclerosis is due to atherosclerotic plaque, which tends to accumulate when the LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio is too high and/or when homocysteine is too elevated.

Calcification of Atherosclerotic Plaque
Furthermore, the atherosclerotic plaque tends to to calcify when vitamin K2 and vitamin D are too low. See Vascular Calcification and Systemic Calcification, which can also be reduced using a calcium supplement that prevents systemic calcium deposits originating from bone degeneration. Calcification may also be associated with bone cells growing in the vascular endothelium as bone breaks down from low vitamin K2, low vitamin D, and low calcium.

C-reactive Protein
High C-reactive protein levels in the blood producing chronic inflammation is another cause of atherosclerosis [46], [47], [48], [49]. Elevated C-reactive protein may be a greater risk factor than high cholesterol in predicting heart attack and stroke risk [46], [50], [51], [52], [53], [54]. Obesity produces stubbornly elevated C-reactive protein levels [55].

Cigarrette Smoking
Smoking cigarrettes can induce atherosclerosis that can sometimes be prevented with vitamin C [64], [65].

Artichoke Leaf Extract and Pantethine [16]
Pantethine (pantothenic acid) at 600-900 mg/day helps lower LDL cholesterol levels and levels of the LDL carrier protein, the apolipoprotein apoB. Lutein from artichoke leaf extract at 1800 mg/day helps prevent LDL peroxidation and elevates HDL levels "enough to confer meaningful removal of excess cholesterol buildup on the arterial wall via reverse cholesterol transport" [16], which statin drugs do not do. (See foods containing lutein [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension]. Green vegetables such as kale, spinach, turnip greens, collard greens, romaine lettuce, broccoli, zucchini, garden peas and Brussel sprouts are the finest sources of lutein.) Luteolin-rich artichoke extract protects low density lipoprotein from oxidation in vitro [25]. Arichoke leaf extract elevates levels of HDL carrier protein apoA. Peroxidized LDL damages arterial walls to promote atherosclerotic plaque formation, somewhat as homocysteine does. Higher HDL levels remove cholesterol deposits from arterial walls, preventing the formation of atherosclerotic plaque. Higher LDL levels tend to transport damaging peroxidized LDL to the arterial wall, while higher HDL levels transport damaging cholesterol away from the arterial wall.

Milk Thistle and Silymarin
Milk thistle [Images] inhibits LDL oxidation and the consequent binding of monocytes to vascular walls and is useful in treating athersclerosis by inhibiting the formation of atherosclerotic plaque [5]. Note that milk thistle is anticancer and contains silibinin and silymarin, which are telomerase inhibitors for cancer cells. Silymarin behaves as a telomerase activator for normal cells, probably from an antioxidant effect confining hTERT to the nucleus due to its property of boosting glutathione.

Taurine
Taurine, which is abundant in fish, is also useful in inhibiting atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease [6].

Pomegranate
Pomegranate has the ability to "reverse clinical measurements of systemic atherosclerosis (in both carotid and coronary arteries)." [7]. It has been shown that pomegranate juice flavonoids inhibit low-density lipoprotein oxidation and cardiovascular diseases [36].

Olive Oil
Extra virgin olive oil [69] increases HDL cholesterol and reduces LDL cholesterol, oxidized LDL, and triglycerides to prevent atherosclerosis. Extra virgin olive oil makes lycopene from tomato sauce more bioavailable.

Lycopene
Lycopene, an antioxidant, is superior for decreasing blood lipid levels, application to oxidized LDL [Encyclopedia], and inflammation. Lycopene slows the accumulation of atherosclerotic plaque by scavenging the powerful oxidant hypochlorous acid associated with atherosclerosis.

Garlic
Garlic suppresses atherosclerosis [Patents, Books, LifeExtension] [59], [60], [61], suppressing the initial fatty streaks in the vascular endothelium that begin an atherosclerotic lesion.

Vitamin C
Vitamin C suppresses cigarette smoke induced atherosclerosis [64], [65].

Lipoprotein phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension, Wikipedia].
High levels indicate that the patient has inflamed atherosclerotic plaques in which LDL oxidation is taking place. Omega-3 fatty acids and niacin may help in lowering levels of lipoprotein phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), and curcumin may inhibit its formation. See Life Extension's Endothelial Defense [Links, Video, Papers, Patents, Books], with cocoa, pomegranate, and GliSODin. See also LDL peroxidation and curcumin.

Pterostilbene
Pterostilbene protects vascular endothelial cells against oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced apoptosis [Patents, Books, LEF] in vitro and in vivo [289].


References
[1] Weber C, Noels H. (2011),
Atherosclerosis: current pathogenesis and therapeutic options, Nat Med 2011 Nov 7;17(11):1410-22.
___[Pomegranate, Olive Oil, Fish Oil, Garlic, Lycopene, Homocysteine Blockers, Vitamin B12, Vitamin B6, Folic Acid].

[2] Lusis AJ (2000), Atherosclerosis, Nature 2000 Sep 14;53. 407(6801):233-41.

[3] Wunder A, Klohs J (2008),
Optical imaging of vascular pathophysiology, Basic Res Cardiol, 103(2):182-90.

[4] William Falloon (2013),
How Atherosclerosis Develops in Aging Humans, Life Extension Magazine, 2013 April.

[5] Wallace S, Vaughn K, Stewart BW, et al. (2008),
Milk thistle extracts inhibit the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and subsequent scavenger receptor-dependent monocyte adhesion, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, June 2008, 56(11):3966-72. [Milk Thistle].

[6] Also see Wojcik OP, Koenig KL, Zeleniuch-Jacquotte A, Costa M, Chen Y. (2010),
The potential protective effects of taurine on coronary heart disease, Atherosclerosis, 2010 Jan;208(1):19-25. [Taurine].

[7] William Falloon (2013),
Misconceptions about Atherosclerosis, Life Extension Magazine, April 2013.

[8] Arenillas JF (2011),
Intracranial atherosclerosis: current concepts, Stroke 2011 Jan;42(1 Suppl):S20-3.

[9] Aronson D, Rayfield EJ (2002),
How hyperglycemia promotes atherosclerosis: molecular mechanisms, Cardiovasc Diabetol 2002 Apr 8;1:1.
___[Diabetes, Glycation, Obesity].

[10] Choy PC, Siow YL, Mymin D, O K (2004),
Lipids and atherosclerosis, Biochem Cell Biol 2004 Feb;82(1):212-24.

[11] Celletti FL, Waugh JM, Amabile PG, Brendolan A, Hilfiker PR, Dake MD (2001),
Vascular endothelial growth factor enhances atherosclerotic plaque progression,
Nat Med 2001 Apr;7(4):425-9. [Angiogenesis Inhibitors]

[12] Chapidze G, Kapanadze S, Dolidze N, Bachutashvili Z, Latsabidze N (2005),
Prevention of coronary atherosclerosis by the use of combination therapy with antioxidant coenzyme Q10 and statins,
Georgian Med News 2005 Jan (118):20-5. [CoQ10, Ubiquinol, Statin Drugs].

[13] Zeb I, Ahmadi N, Nasir K, et al (2012),
Aged garlic extract and coenzyme Q10 have favorable effect on inflammatory markers and coronary atherosclerosis progression: a randomized clinical trial,
J Cardiovasc Dis Res 2012 Jul;3(3):185-90. [CoQ10, Ubiquinol, Garlic, Aged Garlic Extract].

[14] Singh RB, Wander GS, Rastogi A, et al (1998),
Randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial of coenzyme Q10 in patients with acute myocardial infarction,
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[15] Perez-Vizcaino F, Duarte J, Andriantsitohaina R (2006),
Endothelial function and cardiovascular disease: effects of quercetin and wine polyphenols,
Free Radic Res 2006 Oct;40(10):1054-65. [Endothelial Dysfunction, Quercetin, Resveratrol].

[16] Susan Wiggins (2015),
Natural Methods To Control Cholesterol,
Life Extension Magazine May 2015. [Fats, Cholesterol].

[17] Berliner JA, Navab M, Fogelman AM, et al. (1995),
Atherosclerosis: basic mechanisms. Oxidation, inflammation, and genetics,
Circulation 1995 May 1;91(9):2488-96.

[18] Barter, P (2005),
The role of HDL-cholesterol in preventing atherosclerotic disease,
Eur Heart J Supp 2005;7(suppl F):F4-F8.

[19] Parolini C, Marchesi M, Chiesa G (2009),
HDL therapy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases,
Curr Vasc Pharmacol 2009 Oct;7(4):550-6.

[20] Andersson LO (1997),
Pharmacology of apolipoprotein A-I,
Curr Opin Lipidol 1997 Aug;8(4):225-8.

[21] Rondanelli M, Giacosa A, Opizzi A, et al (2013),
Beneficial effects of artichoke leaf extract supplementation on increasing HDL-cholesterol in subjects with primary mild hypercholesterolaemia: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial,
Int J Food Sci Nutr 2013 Feb;64(1):7-15. [Artichoke Leaf Extract, Extra Virgin Olive Oil]

[22] Evans M, Rumberger JA, Azumano I, Napolitano JJ, Citrolo D, Kamiya T (2014),
Pantethine, a derivative of vitamin B5, favorably alters total, LDL and non-HDL cholesterol in low to moderate cardiovascular risk subjects eligible for statin therapy: a triple-blinded placebo and diet-controlled investigation,
Vasc Health Risk Manag 2014;10:89-100. [Pantethine].

[23] Goldenberg I, Benderly M, Sidi R, et al (2009),
Relation of clinical benefit of raising high-density lipoprotein cholesterol to serum levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients with coronary heart disease (from the Bezafibrate Infarction Prevention Trial),
Am J Cardiol 2009 Jan 1;103(1):41-5.

[24] Ramos PA, Guerra AR, Guerreiro O, et al. (2013),
Lipophilic extracts of Cynara cardunculus L. var. altilis (DC): a source of valuable bioactive terpenic compounds,
J Agric Food Chem 2013 Sep 4;61(35):8420-9.

[25] Brown JE, Rice-Evans CA. (1998),
Luteolin-rich artichoke extract protects low density lipoprotein from oxidation in vitro,
Free Radic Res 1998 Sep;29(3):247-55. [Luteolin, Artichoke Extract].

[26] Fritsche J, Beindorff CM, Dachtler M, Zhang H, Lammers JG (2002),
Isolation, characterization and determination of minor artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) leaf extract compounds,
Eur Food Res Technol 2002;215:149-57. [Artichoke Leaf Compounds].

[27] Jiménez-Escrig A, Dragsted LO, Daneshvar B, Pulido R, Saura-Calixto F (2003),
In vitro antioxidant activities of edible artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) and effect on biomarkers of antioxidants in rats,
J Agric Food Chem 2003 Aug 27;51(18):5540-5.

[28] Qiang Z, Lee SO, Ye Z, Wu X, Hendrich S (2012),
Artichoke extract lowered plasma cholesterol and increased fecal bile acids in Golden Syrian hamsters,
Phytother Res 2012 Jul;26(7):1048-52.

[29] Englisch W, Beckers C, Unkauf M, Ruepp M, Zinserling V (2000),
Efficacy of Artichoke dry extract in patients with hyperlipoproteinemia,
Arzneimittelforschung 2000 Mar;50(3):260-5.

[30] Lupattelli G, Marchesi S, Lombardini R, et al (2004),
Artichoke juice improves endothelial function in hyperlipemia,
Life Sci 2004 Dec 31;76(7):775-82.

[31] Bundy R, Walker AF, Middleton RW, Wallis C, Simpson HC (2008),
Artichoke leaf extract (Cynara scolymus) reduces plasma cholesterol in otherwise healthy hypercholesterolemic adults: a randomized, double blind placebo controlled trial, Phytomedicine 2008 Sep;15(9):668-75.

[32] Berliner JA, Navab M, Fogelman AM, Frank JS, Demer LL, Edwards PA, Watson AD, Lusis AJ (1995),
Atherosclerosis: basic mechanisms-oxidation, inflammation, and genetics,
Circulation 1995 May 1;91(9):2488-96.

[33] Slijkhuis W, Mali W, Appelman Y. (2009),
A historical perspective towards a non-invasive treatment for patients with atherosclerosis,
Neth Heart J 2009 Apr;17(4):140-4.

[34] Libby P (2012),
Inflammation in atherosclerosis, Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2012 82. Sep;32(9):2045-51.

[35] Galkina E, Ley K (2009),
Immune and inflammatory mechanisms of atherosclerosis,
Annu Rev Immunol 2009;27:165-97.

[36] Aviram M, Dornfeld L, Kaplan M, et al (2002),
Pomegranate juice flavonoids inhibit low-density lipoprotein oxidation and cardiovascular diseases: studies in atherosclerotic mice and in humans, Drugs Exp Clin Res 2002;28(2-3):49-62.

[37] Kunt T, Forst T, Wilhelm A, et al (1999),
Alpha-lipoic acid reduces expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and endothelial adhesion of human monocytes after stimulation with advanced glycation end products, Clin Sci (Lond) 1999 Jan;96(1):75-82.

[38] Amom Z, Zakaria Z, Mohamed J, et al (2008),
Lipid lowering effect of antioxidant alpha-lipoic Acid in experimental atherosclerosis,
J Clin Biochem Nutr 2008 Sep;43(2):88-94.

[39] Ying Z, Kherada N, Farrar B, et al (2010),
Lipoic acid effects on established atherosclerosis,
Life Sci 2010 Jan 16;86(3-4):95-102.

[40] Shaila HP, Udupa SL, Udupa AL (1998),
Hypolipidemic activity of three indigenous drugs in experimentally induced atherosclerosis,
Int J Cardiol 1998 Dec 1;67(2):119-24. (Hawthorn, Arjuna).

[41] Subramaniam S, Subramaniam R, Rajapandian S, Uthrapathi S, Gnanamanickam VR, Dubey GP (),
Anti-Atherogenic Activity of Ethanolic Fraction of Terminalia arjuna Bark on Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits,
Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2011;2011:487916.

[42] Birlouez-Aragon I, Saavedra G, Tessier FJ, et al (2010),
A diet based on high-heat-treated foods promotes risk factors for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases,
Am J Clin Nutr 2010 May;91(5):1220-6.

[43] Schmidt AM, Yan SD, Wautier JL, Stern D (1999),
Activation of receptor for advanced glycation end products: a mechanism for chronic vascular dysfunction in diabetic vasculopathy and atherosclerosis, Circ Res 1999 Mar 19;84(5):489-97.

[44] Rashid I, van Reyk DM, Davies MJ (2007),
Carnosine and its constituents inhibit glycation of low-density lipoproteins that promotes foam cell formation in vitro,
FEBS Lett 2007 Mar 6;581(5):1067-70.

[45] Basta G, Schmidt AM, and De Caterina R (2004),
Advanced glycation end products and vascular inflammation: implications for accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes,
Cardiovasc Res 2004. Sep 1;63(4):582-92.

[46] William Faloon (2010),
Media Says: No Cure for Heart Disease,
Life Extension Magazine September 2010.

[47] Agmon Y, Khandheria BK, Meissner I, et al (2004),
C-reactive protein and atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta: a population-based transesophageal echocardiographic study,
Arch Intern Med 2004 Sep 13;164(16):1781-7. [C-reactive Protein].

[48] Patrick L, Uzick M (2001),
Cardiovascular disease: C-reactive protein and the inflammatory disease paradigm: HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, alpha-tocopherol, red yeast rice, and olive oil polyphenols. A review of the literature,
Altern Med Rev 2001 Jun;6(3):248-71. [C-reactive Protein].

[49] Dandona P (2008),
Effects of antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic agents on C-reactive protein,
Mayo Clin Proc 2008 Mar;83(3):333-42. [C-reactive Protein].

[50] Ridker PM, Rifai N, Rose L, Buring JE, Cook NR (2002),
Comparison of C-reactive protein and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in the prediction of first cardiovascular events, N Engl J Med 2002 Nov 14;347(20):1557-65. [C-reactive Protein].

[51] Montecucco F, Mach F (2008),
New evidences for C-reactive protein (CRP) deposits in the arterial intima as a cardiovascular risk factor,
Clin Interv Aging 2008;3(2):341-9. [C-reactive Protein].

[52] Ridker PM, Cushman M, Stampfer MJ, Tracy RP, Hennekens CH (1997),
Inflammation, aspirin, and the risk of cardiovascular disease in apparently healthy men,
N Engl J Med 1997 Apr 3;336(14):973-9.

[53] Ridker PM, Buring JE, Shih J, Matias M, Hennekens CH (1998),
Prospective study of C-reactive protein and the risk of future cardiovascular events among apparently healthy women,
Circulation 1998 Aug 25;98(8):731-3.

[54] CM, Hoogeveen RC, Bang H, et al (2005),
Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and risk for incident ischemic stroke in middle-aged men and women in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study,
Arch Intern Med 2005 Nov 28;165(21):2479-84.

[55] Visser M, Bouter LM, McQuillan GM, Wener MH, Harris TB (1999),
Elevated C-reactive protein levels in overweight and obese adults,
JAMA 1999 Dec 8;282(22):2131-5.

[56] Agmon Y, Khandheria BK, Meissner I, et al (2004),
C-reactive protein and atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta: a population-based transesophageal echocardiographic study,
Arch Intern Med 2004 Sep 13;164(16):1781-7.

[57] Levitan EB, Cook NR, Stampfer MJ, et al (2008),
Dietary glycemic index, dietary glycemic load, blood lipids, and C-reactive protein,
Metabolism 2008 Mar;57(3):437-43.

[58] Baynes JW, Thorpe SR (2000),
Glycoxidation and lipoxidation in atherogenesis, Free Radic Biol Med 2000 Jun 15;28(12):1708-16.

[59] Borek C (2006),
Garlic reduces dementia and heart-disease risk,
J Nutr 2006 Mar;136(3 Suppl):810S-812S. [Garlic].

[60] Campbell JH, Efendy JL, Smith NJ, Campbell GR (2001),
Molecular basis by which garlic suppresses atherosclerosis,
J Nutr 2001 Mar;131(3s):1006S-9S. [Garlic].

[61] Efendy JL, Simmons DL, Campbell GR, Campbell JH (1997),
The effect of the aged garlic extract, ‘Kyolic’, on the development of experimental atherosclerosis,
Atherosclerosis 1997 Jul 11;132(1):37-42. [Garlic].

[62] Mach F (2005),
Inflammation is a crucial feature of atherosclerosis and a potential target to reduce cardiovascular events,
Handb Exp Pharmacol 2005;(170):697-722. [Anti-Inflammatory Nutraceuticals]

[63] Jarosz A, Nowicka G (2008),
C-reactive protein and homocysteine as risk factors of atherosclerosis,
Przegl Lek 2008;65(6):268-72.

[64] Ray T, Maity PC, Banerjee S, et al (2010),
Vitamin C prevents cigarette smoke induced atherosclerosis in guinea pig model,
Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis, 2010 Aug 31; 17(8):817-27.

[65] Grassi D, Desideri G, Ferri L, Aggio A, Tiberti S, Ferri C (2010),
Oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction: Say no to cigarette smoking!,
Curr Pharm Des 2010 Jun 15.

[66] Haynes WG (2002),
Hyperhomocysteinemia, vascular function and atherosclerosis: effects of vitamins,
Cardiovasc Drugs Ther 2002 Sep;16(5):391-9.

[67] Bialecka M (1997),
The effect of bioflavonoids and lecithin on the course of experimental atherosclerosis in rabbits,
Ann Acad Med Stetin 1997;43:41-56.

[68] Bogani P, Galli C, Villa M, Visioli F (2007),
Postprandial anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of extra virgin olive oil,
Atherosclerosis 2007;190(1):181-6.

[69] Ramirez-Tortosa MC, Urbano G, López-Jurado M, et al (1999),
Extra-Virgin Olive Oil Increases the Resistance of LDL to Oxidation More than Refined Olive Oil in Free-Living Men with Peripheral Vascular Disease,
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[70] Cucuianu M, Coca M, Hancu N (2007),
Reverse cholesterol transport and atherosclerosis. A mini review,
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[71] Zieman SJ, Melenovsky V, Kass DA (2005),
Mechanisms, pathophysiology, and therapy of arterial stiffness,
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[72] Doherty TM, Asotra K, Fitzpatrick LA, et al (2003),
Calcification in atherosclerosis: bone biology and chronic inflammation at the arterial crossroads,
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[73] Lembo G, Vecchione C, Morisco C, et al (1995),
Arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis: their epidemiology and physiopathology,
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[74] Ferri C, Croce G, Cofini V, et al (2007),
C-reactive protein: interaction with the vascular endothelium and possible role in human atherosclerosis,
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[75] Martins e Silva, Saldanha C (2007),
Diet, atherosclerosis and atherothrombotic events,
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[76] Ignarro LJ, Byrns RE, Sumi D, de NF, Napoli C (2006),
Pomegranate juice protects nitric oxide against oxidative destruction and enhances the biological actions of nitric oxide,
Nitric Oxide 2006 Sep;15(2):93-102.

[77] Ignarro LJ, Napoli C (2006),
Novel features of nitric oxide, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and atherosclerosis,
Curr Atheroscler Rep 2004 Jul;6(4):281-7.

[78] de Nigris F, Williams-Ignarro S, Botti C, et al (2006),
Pomegranate juice reduces oxidized low-density lipoprotein downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in human coronary endothelial cells, Nitric Oxide 2006 Nov;15(3):259-63. [Pomegranate].

[79] de Nigris F, Williams-Ignarro S, Sica V, et al (2007),
Effects of a pomegranate fruit extract rich in punicalagin on oxidationsensitive genes and eNOS activity at sites of perturbed shear stress and atherogenesis, Cardiovasc Res 2007 Jan 15;73(2):414-23. [Pomegranate].

[80] de Nigris F, Williams-Ignarro S, Lerman LO, et al (2005),
Beneficial effects of pomegranate juice on oxidation-sensitive genes and endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity at sites of perturbed shear stress, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2005 Mar 29;102(13):4896-901. [Pomegranate].

[81] Aviram M, Rosenblat M, Gaitini D, et al (2004),
Pomegranate juice consumption for 3 years by patients with carotid artery stenosis reduces common carotid intima-media thickness, blood pressure and LDL oxidation, Clin Nutr 2004 Jun;23(3):423-33. [Pomegranate].

[82] Tuttle D (2005),
Pomegranate reverses atherosclerosis and slows the progression of prostate cancer,
Life Extension Magazine Feb 2007; 13(2):72-7. [Pomegranate, Prostate Cancer].

[83] Sakakura K, Nakano M, Otsuka F, et al (2013),
Pathophysiology of atherosclerosis plaque progression,
Heart Lung Circ 2013;22(6):399-411.

[84] Belcaro G, Dugall M, Ippolito E, et al (2015),
Pycnogenol and Centella Asiatica for preventing asymptomatic atherosclerosis progression into clinical events,
Minerva Cardioangiol 2015 Oct 27.

[85] Lorenz MW, Markus HS, Bots ML, et al (2007),
Prediction of clinical cardiovascular events with carotid intima-media thickness: a systematic review and meta-analysis,
Circulation 2007;115(4):459-67.

[86] Thompson, Randall C et al,
Atherosclerosis across 4000 years of human history: the Horus study of four ancient populations,
The Lancet, Volume 381, Issue 9873, 1211 - 1222.

[87] D’Andrea G (2010),
Pycnogenol: a blend of procyanidins with multifaceted therapeutic applications?,
Fitoterapia 2010;81(7):724-36.

[88] Rohdewald P (2002),
A review of the French maritime pine bark extract (Pycnogenol), a herbal medication with a diverse clinical pharmacology,
Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther 2002;40(4):158-68.

[89] Belcaro G, Dugall M, Hosoi M, et al (2014),
Pycnogenol and Centella Asiatica for asymptomatic atherosclerosis progression,
Int Angiol 2014;33(1):20-6.

[90] Luo H, Wang J, Qiao C, et al (2015),
Pycnogenol attenuates atherosclerosis by regulating lipid maetabolism through the TLR4-NF-kappaB pathway,
Exp Mol Med 2015;47:e191.

[91] Gu JQ, Ikuyama S, Wei P, et al (2008),
Pycnogenol, an extract from French maritime pine, suppresses Toll-like receptor 4-mediated expression of adipose differentiation-related protein in macrophages,
Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 2008;295(6):E1390-400.

[92] Badimon L, Hernandez Vera R, Vilahur G (2013),
Atherothrombotic risk in obesity,
Hamostaseologie 15. 2013;33(4):259-68.

[93] Chistiakov DA, Revin VV, Sobenin IA, et al (2015),
Vascular endothelium: functioning in norm, changes in atherosclerosis and current dietary approaches to improve endothelial function,
Mini Rev Med Chem 2015;15(4):338-50.

[94] Fitzpatrick DF, Bing B, Rohdewald P (1998),
Endothelium-dependent vascular effects of Pycnogenol,
J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 1998;32(4):509-15.

[95] Bentzon JF, Otsuka F, Virmani R, et al (2014),
Mechanisms of plaque formation and rupture,
Circ Res 2014;114(12):1852-66.

[96] William Faloon (2009),
How to Circumvent 17 Independent Heart Attack Risk Factors,
Life Extension Magazine May 2009. [Heart Attack, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].

(1) Excess LDL cholesterol. [Arjuna, Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Hawthorn, Niacin, Pantethine, Pomegranate, Tocotrienols].
(2) Excess cholesterol. [Niacin, Oats, Beta Glucan, Fiber].
(3) Low HDL cholesterol. [Arjuna, Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Pomegranate].
(4) Excess glucose. [Glycation, Obesity; Cinnamon, Caloric Restriction, Vitamin B1, Benfotiamine (Onions)].
___Fructose x10 worse glycation.
(5) Excess homocysteine. [Homocysteine Blockers: Folic Acid, Vitamin B6, Vitamin B12; Super B-vitamin pills].
(6) Excess C-Reactive Protein [Obesity, Caloric Restriction, Fish Oil, Krill Oil, Vitamin C, Exercise, Testosterone].
(7) Insufficient Vitamin D. [Vitamin D, sources, supplements].
(8) Insufficient Vitamin K. [Vitamin K2 (from natto or hard cheeses, deflects vascular calcification), Vitamin K1].
(9) Elevated Triglycerides (Fats). [Arjuna, Extra Virgin Olive Oil].
(10) Low Blood EPA/DHA [Fish Oil].
(11) Low Testosterone [DHEA, Exercise, Fenugreek, Forskolin, Longjack, Pomegranate Seed Oil, Tribulus].
(12) Excess Estrogen (in Men) [Estrogen Protection (DIM), Broccoli, Indole-3-Carbinol, Pomegranate Seed Oil].
(13) Excess Insulin [Lower sugar consumption, Obesity]
(14) Nitric Oxide Deficit [Arginine, Citrulline, Pomegranate] risk factor.
(15) Excess Fibrinogen [Nattokinase, Fish Oil, Vitamin C, Pine bark proanthocyanidins, Bromelain, Garlic].
(16) Hypertension risk factor
____[Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Fish Oil, Magnesium, Taurine, Lipoic Acid, Vitamin D, Melatonin, Cortisol Inhibitors].
(17) Oxidized LDL cholesterol [Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Hawthorn, Lycopene, Pomegranate] risk factor.
(18) Magnesium Deficiency (a cause of sudden death)
____[Leads to hypertension, clots and embolisms: magnesium oxide, tri-magnesium citrate, magnesium supplements].
(19) High Iron. [Metal Ions, Metal Ion Chelation, Fenton Reaction, Cooking, Nutritional Sources: Beef].
Most vascular risk factors for atherosclerosis, heart attack, and angina are also risk factors for stroke.


[97] Roger Alvarez (2016),
Slow the Progression of Atherosclerotic Plaque,
Life Extension Magazine February 2016.

[98] Thompson, Randall C et al.
Atherosclerosis across 4000 years of human history: the Horus study of four ancient populations,
The Lancet, Vol 381, Issue 9873, 1211 - 1222.
__[The History of Atherosclerosis and Its Treatment, Papers, Patents, Books].

[99] Leskinen MJ, Kovanen PT, Lindstedt KA (2003),
Regulation of smooth muscle cell growth, function and death in vitro by activated mast cells — a potential mechanism for the weakening and rupture of atherosclerotic plaques,
Biochem Pharmacol 2003;66(8):1493-8.
___[Activated Mast Cells, Activated Mast Cells in Atherosclerosis].

[100] Cheruvu PK, Finn AV, Gardner C, et al (2007),
Frequency and distribution of thin-cap fibroatheroma and ruptured plaques in human coronary arteries: a pathologic study,
J Am Coll Cardiol 2007;50(10):940-9.
___[Thin-cap Fibroatheroma, Thin-cap Fibroatheroma and Ruptured Plaques].

[101] James JT, Dubery IA (2009),
Pentacyclic triterpenoids from the medicinal herb, Centella asiatica (L.) Urban,
Molecules 2009;14(10):3922-41.
___[Medicinal triterpenoids from Centalla Asiatica].

[102] Incandela L, Cesarone MR, Cacchio M, et al (2001),
Total triterpenic fraction of Centella asiatica in chronic venous insufficiency and in high-perfusion microangiopathy,
Angiology 2001;52 Suppl 2:S9-13.
___[Centella Asiatica, Centalla Asiastica Supplements, Centella Asiatic and Treatment of Venous Insufficiency].

[103] Ivanov V, Ivanova S, Kalinovsky T, et al (2008),
Plant-derived micronutrients suppress monocyte adhesion to cultured human aortic endothelial cell layer by modulating its extracellular matrix composition,
J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 2008;52(1):55-65.
____[Nutraceuticals suppressing monocyte adhesion to arterial walls, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].

[104] Incandela L, Belcaro G, Nicolaides AN, et al (2001),
Modification of the echogenicity of femoral plaques after treatment with total triterpenic fraction of Centella asiatica: a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial,
Angiology 2001;52 Suppl 2:S69-73.

[105] Cesarone MR, Belcaro G, Nicolaides AN, et al (2001),
Increase in echogenicity of echolucent carotid plaques after treatment with total triterpenic fraction of Centella asiatica: a prospective, placebo-controlled, randomized trial,
Angiology 2001;52 Suppl 2:S19-25.

[106] Belcaro G, Maquart FX, Scoccianti M, et al (2011),
TECA (Titrated Extract of Centella Asiatica): new microcirculatory, biomolecular, and vascular application in preventive and clinical medicine. A status paper,
Panminerva Med 2011;53(3 Suppl 1):105-18.

[107] D’Andrea G (2010),
Pycnogenol: a blend of procyanidins with multifaceted therapeutic applications?,
Fitoterapia 2010;81(7):724-36.

[108] Rohdewald P (2002),
A review of the French maritime pine bark extract (Pycnogenol), a herbal medication with a diverse clinical pharmacology,
Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther 2002;40(4):158-68.

[109] Belcaro G, Dugall M, Hosoi M, et al (2014),
Pycnogenol and Centella Asiatica for asymptomatic atherosclerosis progression,
Int Angiol 2014;33(1):20-6.

[110] Luo H, Wang J, Qiao C, et al (2015),
Pycnogenol attenuates atherosclerosis by regulating lipid maetabolism through the TLR4-NF-kappaB pathway,
Exp Mol Med 2015;47:e191.

[111] Gu JQ, Ikuyama S, Wei P, et al (2008),
Pycnogenol, an extract from French maritime pine, suppresses Toll-like receptor 4-mediated expression of adipose differentiation-related protein in macrophages,
Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 2008;295(6):E1390-400.

[112] Chistiakov DA, Revin VV, Sobenin IA, et al (2015),
Vascular endothelium: functioning in norm, changes in atherosclerosis and current dietary approaches to improve endothelial function,
Mini Rev Med Chem 2015;15(4):338-50.

[113] Fitzpatrick DF, Bing B, Rohdewald P (1998),
Endothelium-dependent vascular effects of Pycnogenol,
J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 1998;32(4):509-15.

[114] Enseleit F, Sudano I, Periat D, et al (2012),
Effects of Pycnogenol on endothelial function in patients with stable coronary artery disease: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over study,
Eur Heart J 2012;33(13):1589-97.

[115] Hu S, Belcaro G, Cornelli U, et al (2015),
Effects of Pycnogenol on endothelial dysfunction in borderline hypertensive, hyperlipidemic, and hyperglycemic individuals: the borderline study,
Int Angiol 2015;34(1):43-52.

[116] Bentzon JF, Otsuka F, Virmani R, et al (2014),
Mechanisms of plaque formation and rupture,
Circ Res 2014;114(12):1852-66.

[117] Sakakura K, Nakano M, Otsuka F, et al (2013),
Pathophysiology of atherosclerosis plaque progression,
Heart Lung Circ 2013;22(6):399-411.

[118] Belcaro G, Dugall M, Ippolito E, et al (2015),
Pycnogenol and Centella Asiatica for preventing asymptomatic atherosclerosis progression into clinical events,
Minerva Cardioangiol 2015 Oct 27.

[119] Belcaro G, Ippolito E, Dugall M, et al (2015),
Pycnogenol and Centella asiatica in the management of asymptomatic atherosclerosis progression,
Int Angiol 2015;34(2):150-7.

[120] Lorenz MW, Markus HS, Bots ML, et al (2007),
Prediction of clinical cardiovascular events with carotid intima-media thickness: a systematic review and meta-analysis,
Circulation 2007;115(4):459-67.

[121] Scott Fogle, ND (2016),
The Most Important Blood Tests Available for Assessing Cardiovascular Risk,
Life Extension Magazine May 2016, Ask the Doctor.

Atherosclerotic Plaque Formation [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension];
Blood Tests [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension];
Blood Tests for Cardiovascular Risk Assessment [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension];
Nutraceuticals for LDL particle size control [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension];
Techniques for LDL particle size control [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension];

It is useful to know the number of LDL particles circulating in the blood [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension]. A higher amount of smaller LDL particles is much more dangerous than a smaller amount of larger LDL particles. See small dense LDL versus large buoyant LDL [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension]. Small dense LDL cholesterol more easily penetrates the blood vessel wall and starts the process of plaque formation. We have new blood testing technology for both particle count and the size of LDL particles [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension]. "The best result you can get is a low particle count combined with large buoyant LDL. The worst result is a high particle count with small dense LDL, which is a very bad combination."

The NMR LipoProfile Test [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension] produces this information using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for LDL testing [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension] to directly measure particle count and size. "You want a low LDL-P (low LDL particle count), low small LDL-P (low small LDL particle count), and low LP-IR Score (low insulin resistance score) combined with a high HDL-P (high HDL particle count) and large LDL size for the lowest cardiovascular risk."

Other kinds of blood testing are desirable, including:
__Oxidized LDL testing [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension].
__F2-Isoprostanes urine testing [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension].
__MPO (myeloperoxidase) testing [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension].
__MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) gene testing [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension].
____Deals with methylation, folate metabolism, and homocysteine levels.
__COMT (catechol-O-methyltransferase) testing [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension].
____Looks at how specific neurotransmitters are metabolized [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books].
__Arachidonic_Acid/EPA ratio test [Links, Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension].
___When the Arachidonic_Acid/EPA ratio is higher, there is preferred incorporation of AA into membranes over EPA,
___producing a pro-inflammatory environment. The optimal ratio of AA: EPA is around 1.7.


[122] Filiberto Zadini, Giorgio Zadini, Original Assignee: Atheranova Operations, Inc. (2013),
Dissolution of arterial plaque US 20130029946 A1,
___[Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].
___ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].
___Serious adverse consequences can result from a x2 overdose. Sensitive stuff.
___Can dissolve gallstones and atherosclerotic plaque. Natually occurring. See Ursodiol.
___RELATED: LEF search on arterial plaque dissolution produces:
___Serrapeptase 10 mg 90 capsules: Solaray, Item# 28548.(0) Retail Price: $24.99.
_____Serrapeptase [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF]. Silkworm's coccoon dissolving enzyme.
_______Serrapeptase for arterial plaque dissolution [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].
_______Serrapeptase: The natural anti-inflammatory, Life Extension Magazine, September 2003.

[123] Nadia Mason (2014),
Focus on Serrapeptase [Online],
Discover Nutrition November 1, 2014.

" Because of its ability to dissolve fibrin, serrapeptase has also been used to dissolve arterial plaque, fibrous blockages in clogged or hardened arteries. As serrapeptase only dissolves dead or damaged tissue, this could enable the dissolution of harmful atherosclerotic plaques without causing any harm to the inside of the arteries. Studies of serrapeptase supplementation have found positive benefits with a dosage of around 10mg, taken after meals three times daily. No long-term studies of this supplement have yet been conducted, although studies to date suggest that supplementation for a period of 4 weeks seems safe (1,2)."

___Serrapeptase 10 mg 90 capsules: Solaray, Item# 28548.(0) Retail Price: $24.99.
_____Serrapeptase [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF]. Silkworm's coccoon dissolving enzyme.
_______Serrapeptase for arterial plaque dissolution [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].
_______Serrapeptase: The natural anti-inflammatory, Life Extension Magazine, September 2003.

[124] Dr. H A Nieper - Germany (),
Silk Worm Enzymes For Carotid Artery Blockage [OnLine].
"Serapeptase is a stronger saseinolytic (fibrinolytic) agent than any other known alkaline or neutral protease such as bromelain or pronase."
___See Serapeptase as a fibrinolytic agent [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].
___Bromelain as a fibrinolytic agent [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF; Index/Bromelain].
___Pronase as a fibrinolytic agent [Papers, Patents, Books, LEF].

[125] George E. Felton (1980),
Fibrinolytic and antithrombotic action of bromelain may eliminate thrombosis in heart patients [Online],
Medical Hypotheses Volume 6, Issue 11, November 1980, Pages 1123-1133.

"Bromelain plasminogen activator will produce plasmin in rat experiments... Since bromelain therapy leads to formation of platelets with increased resistance to aggregation, it is obvious that the dominant endogenous prostaglandins being produced must be from the group that increases platelet cyclic AMP levels (prostacyclin, PGE1, etc.). The combination of fibrinolytic and antithrombic properties appear to be effective and two large scale tests on heart patients have shown a practically complete elimination of thrombosis."


[126] Pierro Francesco Di (2014),
Fibrinolytic compositions comprising bromelain and nattokinase for the prevention and treatment of phlebothrombotic states, WO 2014079689 A1, May 30, 2014.

[127] William Faloon (2015),
Live Longer By Changing How You Cook!,
Life Extension Magazine August 2015. [AGEs, Carcinogens].
[128] Hansson GK, Robertson AK, Soderberg-Naucler C (2006),
Inflammation and atherosclerosis,
Annu Rev Pathol 2006;1:297-329. [Inflammation].

[129] Libby P, Ridker PM, Maseri A (2002),
Inflammation and Atherosclerosis,
Circulation 2002;105(9):1135-43. [Inflammation].

[129] Covas MI, Nyyssonen K, Poulsen HE, et al. (2006),
The effect of polyphenols in olive oil on heart disease risk factors: a randomized trial,
Ann Intern Med 2006;145(5):333-41.

[130] Covas MI (2007),
Olive oil and the cardiovascular system,
Pharmacol Res 34. 2007;55(3):175-86.

[131] Bendinelli B, Masala G, Saieva C, et al. (2011),
Fruit, vegetables, and olive oil and risk of coronary heart disease in Italian women: the EPICOR Study,
Am J Clin Nutr 2011;93(2):275-83.

[132] Estruch R, Ros E, Salas-Salvado J, et al. (2013),
Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease with a Mediterranean diet,
N Engl J Med 2013;368(14):1279-90.

[133] Dimitriou M, Rallidis LS, Theodoraki EV, et al. (2016),
Exclusive olive oil consumption has a protective effect on coronary artery disease; overview of the THISEAS study,
Public Health Nutr 2016;19(6):1081-7.

[134] Qureshi AA, Sami SA, Salser WA, et al. (2002),
Dose-dependent suppression of serum cholesterol by tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF25) of rice bran in hypercholesterolemic humans,
Atherosclerosis 2002;161(1):199-207. [Tocotrienols].

[135] Tan DT, Khor H, Low W, et al. (1991),
Effect of a palm-oil-vitamin E concentrate on the serum and lipoprotein lipids in humans,
The American journal of clinical nutrition 1991;53(4):1027S-30S. [Tocotrienols].

[136] Baliarsingh S, Beg ZH, Ahmad J (-),
The therapeutic impacts of tocotrienols in type 2 diabetic patients with hyperlipidemia,
Atherosclerosis 182(2):367-74.

[137] Qureshi AA, Bradlow BA, Brace L, et al. (1995),
Response of hypercholesterolemic subjects to administration of tocotrienols,
Lipids 1995;30(12):1171-7.

[138] Mendelsohn Andrew R. and Larrick James W. (2015),
Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor ? Co-Activator-1a Cooperate to Protect Cells from DNA Damage and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Vascular Senescence [Abstract PDF],
Rejuvenation Research October 2015, 18(5): 479-483.

"Alpha lipoic acid (ALA) stimulated expression of PGC-1a and TERT and reversed DNA damage, vascular senescence, and atherosclerosis, similarly to ectopic expression of PGC-1a. ALA stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling, which in turn activated the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a co-factor for PGC-1a expression. The possibility that ALA might induce TERT to extend telomeres in human cells suggests that ALA may be useful in treating atherosclerosis and other aging-related diseases."


[139] Singh RB, Mengi SA, Xu YJ, Arneja AS, Dhalla NS (2002),
Pathogenesis of atherosclerosis: A multifactorial process,
Exp Clin Cardiol 2002 Spring;7(1):40-53.

[140] William Faloon (2007),
A Lethal Misconception of Epidemic Proportion,
Life Extension Magazine May 2007. William Faloon on homocysteine and heart disease.

"Mainstream medicine is fixated on the misconception that atherosclerosis is caused by excess levels of “lipids” in the blood. Lipids are usually defined as total cholesterol, LDL (low-density lipoprotein), and triglycerides.... What doctors fail to understand is that atherosclerosis begins when the inner arterial wall (the endothelium) sustains an injury [142]."

This is typically from oxidants such as homocysteine or oxidized LDL cholesterol (oxidized by homocysteine).
In the text Faloon lists:

(1) High blood pressure, 4-10
(2) excess cholesterol-LDL-triglycerides, 11-20
(3) low HDL, 21-23
(4) cigarette smoking, 24-32
(5) diabetes, 33-38
(6) obesity, 39-42
(7) lack of exercise 43-49
(8) high-normal levels of glucose, 50-52
(9) insulin, 53,54
(10) iron, 55-57
(11) homocysteine, 58-84
(12) fibrinogen, 85-98
(13) low free testosterone (in men), 99-102
(14) levels of C-reactive protein that is higher than optimal. 103-125. See [96].

"In my early career, I performed over 300 postmortem arterial dissections [Images, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension]. In aged cadavers, I often found arteries that were so occluded that it was virtually impossible to insert a small catheter (tube) into them. My experience provided a vivid image of the jagged structural devastation inflicted by atherosclerosis."

For the 17 daggers aimed at your arterial wall that damage the vascular endothelium, see [96].

[141] 1. Thom T, Haase N, Rosamond W, et al. (2006),
Heart disease and stroke statistics—2006 update: a report from the American Heart Association Statistics Committee and Stroke Statistics Subcommittee,
Circulation 2006 Feb 14;113(6):e85-e151. [Heart Disease Statistics, Stroke Statistics]

[142] 2. Friedman RJ, Moore S, Singal DP (1975),
Repeated endothelial injury and induction of atherosclerosis in normolipemic rabbits by human serum,
Lab Invest 1975 Mar;32(3):404-15. [Sources of Endothelial Injury].

(4-10) Hypertension and Endothelial Dysfunction

[143] 4. Chang HJ, Chung J, Choi SY, et al. (2004),
Endothelial dysfunction in patients with exaggerated blood pressure response during treadmill test,
Clin Cardiol 2004 Jul;27(7):421-25. [Endothelial Dysfunction, Hypertension].

[144] 5. Higashi Y, Yoshizumi M (2004),
Exercise and endothelial function: role of endothelium-derived nitric oxide and oxidative stress in healthy subjects and hypertensive patients,
Pharmacol Ther 2004 Apr;102(1):87-96.
___[Exercise, Endothelial Dysfunction, Hypertension, Nitric Oxide, Endothelium-derived Nitric Oxide, Oxidative Stress].

[145] 6. Rodriguez-Porcel M, Lerman LO, Herrmann J, et al. (2003),
Hypercholesterolemia and hypertension have synergistic deleterious effects on coronary endothelial function,
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2003 May 1;23(5):885-91.
___[Hypercholesterolemia, Hypertension, Coronary Endothelial Function].

[146] 7. Tu L, Wei W, Liu X, Deng Y, Yu S (1999),
Endothelial function and carotid artery wall thickening in patients with early essential hypertension,
J Tongji Med Univ 1999;19(4):288-90, 303. [Carotid Artery Wall Thickening, Hypertension].

[147] 8. Sutton-Tyrrell K, Bostom A, Selhub J, Zeigler-Johnson C (1997),
High homocysteine levels are independently related to isolated systolic hypertension in older adults,
Circulation 1997 Sep 16;96(6):1745-9. [Homocysteine, Hypertension, Systolic Hypertension].

[148] 9. Puddu P, Puddu GM, Zaca F, Muscari A (2000),
Endothelial dysfunction in hypertension,
Acta Cardiol 2000 Aug;55(4):221-32. [Endothelial Dysfunction, Hypertension].

[149] 10. Bolad I, Delafontaine P (2005),
Endothelial dysfunction: its role in hypertensive coronary disease,
Curr Opin Cardiol 2005 Jul;20(4):270-4. [Endothelial Dysfunction, Hypertension, Hypertensive Coronary Disease].

(11-20) excess cholesterol-LDL-triglycerides

[150] 11. Maggi FM, Raselli S, Grigore L, et al. (2004),
Lipoprotein remnants and endothelial dysfunction in the postprandial phase,
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2004 Jun;89(6):2946-50.
__[Postprandial lipoprotein remnants, Endothelial Dysfunction, Postprandial endothelial dysfunction].

[151] 12. Laaksonen R, Janatuinen T, Vesalainen R, et al. (2002),
High oxidized LDL and elevated plasma homocysteine contribute to the early reduction of myocardial flow reserve in healthy adults,
Eur J Clin Invest 2002 Nov;32(11):795-802.
___[LDL Peroxidation, Homocysteine, Plasma Homocysteine, Myocardial Flow Reserve].

[152] 13. Dardik R, Varon D, Tamarin I, et al. (2000),
Homocysteine and oxidized low density lipoprotein enhanced platelet adhesion to endothelial cells under flow conditions: distinct mechanisms of thrombogenic modulation,
Thromb Haemost 2000 Feb;83(2):338-44.

[153] 14. Voutilainen S, Morrow JD, Roberts LJ, et al. (1999),
Enhanced in vivo lipid peroxidation at elevated plasma total homocysteine levels,
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 1999 May;19(5):1263-6.

[154] 15. De Caterina R, Lenzi S (1998),
The role of LDL in the origin and progression of atherosclerosis: pathobiological concepts on the origin and development of atherosclerotic lesions and the role of the endothelium,
G Ital Cardiol 1998 Feb;28(2):158-67.

[155] 16. Drexel H, Amann FW, Beran J, et al. (1994),
Plasma triglycerides and three lipoprotein cholesterol fractions are independent predictors of the extent of coronary atherosclerosis,
Circulation 1994 Nov;90(5):2230-5.

[156] 17. Sharrett AR, Patsch W, Sorlie PD, et al. (1994),
Associations of lipoprotein cholesterols, apolipoproteins A-I and B, and triglycerides with carotid atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study,
Arterioscler Thromb 1994 Jul;14(7):1098-104.

[157] 18. Vasques E, Almeida AL, Noya V, et al. (2006),
Impairment of endothelium-dependent aorta relaxation by phospholipid components of oxidized low-density lipoprotein,
Endothelium 2006 Jan;13(1):1-8.

[158] 19. Badimon L, Martinez-Gonzalez J, Llorente-Cortes V, Rodriguez C, Padro T (2006),
Cell biology and lipoproteins in atherosclerosis,
Curr Mol Med 2006 Aug;6(5):439-56.

[159] 20. Vakkilainen J, Makimattila S, Seppala-Lindroos A, et al. (2000),
Endothelial dysfunction in men with small LDL particles,
Circulation 2000 Aug 15;102(7):716-21.

(21-23) low HDL

[160] 21. Calabresi L, Gomaraschi M, Franceschini G (2003),
Endothelial protection by high-density lipoproteins: from bench to bedside,
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2003 Oct 1;23(10):1724-31.

[161] 22. Spieker LE, Sudano I, Hurlimann D, et al. (2002),
High-density lipoprotein restores endothelial function in hypercholesterolemic men,
Circulation 2002 Mar 26;105(12):1399-402.

[162] 23. Toikka JO, Ahotupa M, Viikari JS, et al. (1999),
Constantly low HDL-cholesterol concentration relates to endothelial dysfunction and increased in vivo LDL-oxidation in healthy young men,
Atherosclerosis 1999 Nov 1;147(1):133-8.

(24-32) Smoking and Atherosclerois

[163] 24. Ikonomidis I, Lekakis J, Vamvakou G, Andreotti F, Nihoyannopoulos P (2005),
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(33-38) diabetes

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[177] 38. Panus C, Mota M, Vladu D, Vanghelie L, Raducanu CL (2003),
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(39-42) obesity

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(43-49) lack of exercise

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[183] 44. Mitu F, Mitu M (2003),
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[188] 49. Superko HR (1995),
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(50-52) high-normal levels of glucose

[189] 50. Ceriello A (2004),
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[190] 51. Thomas GN, Chook P, Qiao M, et al. (2004),
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(53-54) insulin

[192] 53. Muis MJ, Bots ML, Bilo HJ, et al. (2005),
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[193] 54. Yki-Jarvinen H (2003),
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(55-57) Iron and Atherosclerosis

[194] 55. Howes PS, Zacharski LR, Sullivan J, Chow B (2000),
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[195] 56. de VB, Marx JJ (1999),
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[196] 57. Chau LY (2000),
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(58-84) homocysteine and atherosclerosis

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[198] 59. Sainani GS, Sainani R (2002),
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[199] 60. Zeng XK, Guan YF, Remick DG, Wang X (2005),
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[200] 61. Zeng XK, Remick DG, Wang X (2004),
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Acta Pharmacol Sin 2004 Nov;25(11):1419-25.

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Brain 2004 Jan;127(Pt 1):212-9.

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Blood 2004 Apr 1;103(7):2624-9.

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Increased superoxide production in coronary arteries in hyperhomocysteinemia: role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, NAD(P)H oxidase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase,
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[204] 65. Loscalzo J (2003),
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[206] 67. Eberhardt RT, Forgione MA, Cap A, et al. (2000),
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[207] 68. Folsom AR, Nieto FJ, McGovern PG, et al. (1998),
Prospective study of coronary heart disease incidence in relation to fasting total homocysteine, related genetic polymorphisms, and B vitamins: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study,
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[208] 69. Woo KS, Chook P, Lolin YI, et al. (1997),
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[209] 70. Bots ML, Launer LJ, Lindemans J, Hofman A, Grobbee DE (1997),
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[211] 72. Lentz SR, Sobey CG, Piegors DJ, et al. (1996),
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[214] 75. Berwanger CS, Jeremy JY, Stansby G (1995),
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[217] 78. Harker LA, Harlan JM, Ross R (1983),
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[218] 79. Wall RT, Rubenstein MD, Cooper SL (1981),
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[219] 80. Rasouli ML, Nasir K, Blumenthal RS, et al. (2005),
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[220] 81. Anon (2002),
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JAMA 1999 Jun 9;281(22):2113-8.

(85-98) Fibrinogen and atherosclerosis

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[235] 96. Levenson J, Giral P, Megnien JL, et al. (1997),
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[236] 97. Koenig W (2003),
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(99-102) low free testosterone (in men)

[238] 99. Channer KS, Jones TH (2003),
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Heart 2003 Feb;89(2):121-2.

[239] 100. English KM, Mandour O, Steeds RP, et al. (2000),
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Eur Heart J 2000 Jun;21(11):890-4.

[240] 101. Malkin CJ, Pugh PJ, Jones RD, Jones TH, Channer KS (2003),
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[241] 102. Jones RD, Nettleship JE, Kapoor D, Jones HT, Channer KS (2005),
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(103-125) levels of C-reactive protein that are higher than optimal

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[244] 105. Ridker PM, Rifai N, Rose L, Buring JE, Cook NR (2002),
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[246] 107. Bermudez EA, Ridker PM (2002),
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[247] 108. Virmani R, Burke AP, Kolodgie FD, Farb A (2002),
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[248] 109. Rifai N, Ridker PM (2002),
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[251] 112. Di Napoli M, Papa F, Bocola V (2001),
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[252] 113. Ridker PM, Stampfer MJ, Rifai N (2001),
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[253] 114. Rifai N (2001),
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Supplementation with carnosine decreases plasma triglycerides and modulates atherosclerotic plaque composition in diabetic apo E(-/-) mice,
Atherosclerosis 2014;232(2):403-9. [Carnosine, Diabetes].

[289] Zhang L, Zhou G, Song W, et al. (2012),
Pterostilbene protects vascular endothelial cells against oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo,
Apoptosis 2012;17(1):25-36.

[290] Michael Downey (2017),
Arterial Plaque Rupture,
Life Extension Magazine May 2017.
___Gotu Kola improves the stability of soft atherosclerotic plaque
___by improving the expression of collagen.
___French maritime pine bark extract (150 mg) plus Gotu Kola (225 mg) improves soft plaque stability best.

[291] Luzzi R, Belcaro G, Ippolito E (2016),
Carotid plaque stabilization induced by the supplement association Pycnogenol(R) and centella asiatica (Centellicum(R)),
Minerva Cardioangiol 2016;64(6):603-9. [Pycnogenol, Pine Bark Extract, Gotu Kola].

[292] Cheruvu PK, Finn AV, Gardner C, et al. (2007),
Frequency and distribution of thin-cap fibroatheroma and ruptured plaques in human coronary arteries: a pathologic study,
J Am Coll Cardiol 2007;50(10):940-9.

[293] Miyazawa T, Nakagawa K, Shimasaki S, et al. (2012),
Lipid glycation and protein glycation in diabetes and atherosclerosis,
Amino Acids 2012;42(4):1163-70.

[294] Saffi MA, Furtado MV, Polanczyk CA, et al. (2015),
Relationship between vascular endothelium and periodontal disease in atherosclerotic lesions: Review article,
World J Cardiol 2015;7(1):26-30.

[295] Osika W, Dangardt F, Gronros J, et al. (2007),
Increasing peripheral artery intima thickness from childhood to seniority,
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2007;27(3):671-6.

[296] Kolodgie FD, Burke AP, Farb A, et al. (2001),
The thin-cap fibroatheroma: a type of vulnerable plaque: the major precursor lesion to acute coronary syndromes,
Curr Opin Cardiol 2001;16(5):285-92.

[297] Glycation and glycoxidation of low-density lipoproteins by glucose. (fill out).

[298] Paul M Ridker, M.D., Brendan M. Everett, M.D., Tom Thuren, M.D. et. al. (2017),
Antiinflammatory Therapy with Canakinumab for Atherosclerotic Disease,
The New England Journal of Medicine, August 27, 2017, DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1707914. [Canakinumab].

[299] Navab M, Ananthramaiah GM, Reddy ST, et al. (2004),
The oxidation hypothesis of atherogenesis: the role of oxidized phospholipids and HDL,
J Lipid Res 2004;45(6):993-1007.

[300] Wang JC, Bennett M (2012),
Aging and atherosclerosis: mechanisms, functional consequences, and potential therapeutics for cellular senescence,
Circ Res 2012;111(2):245-59.

[301] Kearns CE, Schmidt LA, Glantz SA (2016),
Sugar Industry and Coronary Heart Disease Research: A Historical Analysis of Internal Industry Documents,
JAMA Intern Med 2016;176(11):1680-5.

[302] McGandy RB, Hegsted DM, Stare FJ (1967),
Dietary fats, carbohydrates and atherosclerotic vascular disease,
N Engl J Med 1967;277(4):186-92 contd.

[303] McGandy RB, Hegsted DM, Stare FJ (1967),
Dietary fats, carbohydrates and atherosclerotic vascular disease,
N Engl J Med 1967;277(5):245-7 concl.

[304] Danaei G, Lawes CM, Vander Hoorn S, et al. Global and regional mortality from ischaemic heart disease and stroke attributable to higher-than-optimum blood glucose concentration: comparative risk assessment,
Lancet 2006;368(9548):1651-9.

[305] Hamerman D (2005),
Osteoporosis and atherosclerosis: biological linkages and the emergence of dual-purpose therapies,
Qjm 2005;98(7):467-84.

[306] Toma I, McCaffrey TA (2012),
Transforming growth factor-beta and atherosclerosis: interwoven atherogenic and atheroprotective aspects,
Cell Tissue Res 2012;347(1):155-75.

[307] Hamerman D (2005),
Osteoporosis and atherosclerosis: biological linkages and the emergence of dual-purpose therapies,
Qjm 2005;98(7):467-84.

[308] Toma I, McCaffrey TA (2012),
Transforming growth factor-beta and atherosclerosis: interwoven atherogenic and atheroprotective aspects,
Cell Tissue Res 2012;347(1):155-75.

[309] William Faloon (2009),
The Cholesterol Controversy, Life Extension Magazine, Feb 2009.

"Perhaps no other nutrient has demonstrated better anti-LDL oxidation effects than pomegranate. In a clinical study, human subjects taking pomegranate showed a beneficial 35% reduction in carotid intima-media thickness accompanied by a 45% improvement in carotid blood flow. As evidenced by the chart above, pomegranate improved markers related to LDL oxidation by up to 130%!" [6]. [LDL peroxidation, Pomegranate].


[310] Michael Ozner, MD (2018),
Life Extension Magazine (Interview: Ask The Doctor) February 2018.
 

Links/Atherogenic Lipoproteins, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension;

The apolipoprotein B (apo B) blood test [Patents, Books, LEF] measures the number of potentially dangerous particles that can lead to atherosclerois [Patents, Books, LEF]. A second test, the LDL-P test [Patents, Books, LEF], can also be used since it measures the total number of LDL particles [Patents, Books, LEF].

Jim Green has left an In Memory comment for Joseph Damilini.
Jul 09, 2019 at 4:33 PM

CMV (Cytomegalovirus)
[Index, Wikipedia/Cytomegalovirus, Links, Images, Video, Papers, Patents, Books, LEF;
Virology, Virology/Virus Table, Glioma, Brain Cancer; AplasticAnemia, anemia[39]].
 

"HCMV is found throughout all geographic locations and socioeconomic groups, and infects between 50% and 80% of adults in the United States (40% worldwide) as indicated by the presence of antibodies in much of the general population. Seroprevalence is age-dependent: 58.9% of individuals aged 6 and older are infected with CMV while 90.8% of individuals aged 80 and older are positive for HCMV". - Wikipedia. "One study found a 42% increase in the annual death rate among older adults with CMV compared to those without, corresponding to a 3.7-year reduction in life expectancy after age 65" (73). [], []."

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a herpes-family virus [virus table]. CMV (cytomegalovirus) viral infection [Links] devours resources of the immune system in elderly victims, although its visible effects may be minimal at first. This causes the CMV viral pathogen to be impacting in immunosenescence. CMV viral infection is widespread in many populations. "Chronic CMV infection is associated with frailty, cognitive decline, and arterial occlusion." - William Faloon [1]. Consider the effect of cytomegalovirus on telomere length [Images, Papers]. CMV also turns out to be a key element in glioma brain cancers. 1,000 Americans die every month from incurable glioblastoma, for which survival averages 15 months. Valganciclovir has extended survival to over four years [11], [12].
 
Animal Virus Family Typical Member Genome Size (kbp) Cures showing antiviral activity
Herpesviruses [Index] Cytomegalovirus (CMV)
___(DNA genome)
___Glioma,
___Glioblastoma multiforme
235 Garlic [Index, Ref, Images],
Glycyrrhizin [Index, Ref, Images],
St. John's Wort [Index, Ref]
Hypericin from St.John's Wort,
Natural Killer cell boosters,
___Active hexose correlated compound (AHCC),
___Alpha Lipoic Acid,
___Arabinoxylin,
___Beta carotene,
___Chronic resistance exercise training,
___Cistanche,
___Curcumin,
___Garlic,
___Genistein,
___Ginseng,
___Lentinan,
___Mistletoe,
___More…color="#0066cc">Modified arabinoxylan rice bran,
___N-Acetylcysteine,
___Resveratrol,
___Selenium,
___Shiitake Mushrooms,
___Vitamin B12 (Methylcobalmin),
___Vitamin C,
___Vitamin D3,
___Vitamin E,
___Zinc,
Prescription Drugs:
__Valganciclovir

 

See Virology/Virus Table, which displays some nutraceutical cures for CMV, and CMV vaccine development. Note that some herpes viruses are treatable with eugenol from cinnamon. Garlic and glycyrrhiza (the source of licorice) can be used to treat CMV. St. John's Wort is active against cytomegalovirus via hypericin, a constituent of St. John's wort. Natural Killer cell boosters are also valuable in fighting CMV. Valganciclovir [Papers, Patents, Books, LifeExtension] is also prescribed to treat cytomegalovirus [11]. "We conclude that the (TA-65 Patton Protocol) protocol lengthens critically short telomeres and remodels the relative proportions of circulating leukocytes of CMV+ subjects toward the more “youthful” profile of CMV- subjects." [7].

References
[1] William Faloon (2015), A Common Virus, Life Extension Magazine, Jan 2015.

[2] Aubrey de Grey and Michael Rae, Ending Aging, pp.209-215, material on CMV.

[3] Lisa Antone (2014),
Common Virus Links to Deadly Brain Cancer with preamble by William Faloon,
Life Extension Magazine, February 2014. [Glioma]

[4] Shiraki K, Yukawa T, Kurokawa M, Kageyama S (1998),
Cytomegalovirus infection and its possible treatment with herbal medicines,
Nihon Rinsho 1998 Jan;56(1):156-60. [Cures for CMV (Patents, Books, LEF); Garlic; Viral Cures].

[5] Duplicate.

[6] Tsoukas P. (2012),
Immune senescence and cardiovascular morbidity as a result of chronic cytomegalovirus infection,
RCSIsmj 2012;5:67-70.

[7] Calvin B. Harley, Weimin Liu, Maria Blasco, Elsa Vera, William H. Andrews, Laura A. Briggs, and Joseph M. Raffaele (2010), A Natural Product Telomerase Activator As Part of a Health Maintenance Program, Rejuvenation Research, September 7, 2010.

[8] Savva GM, Pachnio A, Kaul B, et al. (2013),
Cytomegalovirus infection is associated with increased mortality in the older population,
Aging Cell 2013 Jun;12(3):381-7.

[9] Kanapeckiene V, Kalibatas J, Redaitiene E, Ceremnych J (2007),
The association between cytomegalovirus infection and aging process,
Medicina (Kaunas) 2007;43(5):419-24.

[10] Salem ML, Hossain MS (2000),
Protective effect of black seed oil from Nigella sativa against murine cytomegalovirus infection,
Int J Immunopharmacol 2000 Sep;22(9):729-40.

[11] William Faloon (2015),
Major Advances In Glioblastoma Treatment,
Life Extension Magazine September 2015.
"In 2015, the CBS News program “60 Minutes” featured a story about research emanating from Duke University Medical Center showing complete responses in terminal glioblastoma patients who were administered a re-engineered polio virus directly into their brain tumor. The re-engineered virus prompted a powerful immune response against the viral-infected cancer cells, which in some patients appeared to eradicate their glioblastoma."

[12] “60 Minutes” segment at www.LifeExtension.com/glio for information on new treatment for glioblastoma. To inquire about qualifying for Duke University study, call Brittany at 919-684-5301 and press option 1.

[13] Staras SA, Dollard SC, Radford KW, Flanders WD, Pass RF, Cannon MJ (2006),
Seroprevalence of cytomegalovirus infection in the United States, 1988-1994,
Clin Infect Dis 2006 Nov 1;43(9):1143-51.

[14] Smithey MJ, Li G, Venturi V, Davenport MP, Nikolich-Žugich J (2012),
Lifelong persistent viral infection alters the naive T cell pool, impairing CD8 T cell immunity in late life,
J Immunol 2012 Dec 1;189(11):5356-66.

[15] Weinberger B, Lazuardi L, Weiskirchner I, et al. (2007),
Healthy aging and latent infection with CMV lead to distinct changes in CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell subsets in the elderly,
Hum Immunol 2007 Feb;68(2):86-90.

[16] Fletcher JM, Vukmanovic-Stejic M, Dunne PJ, et al. (2005),
Cytomegalovirus-specific CD4+ T-cells in healthy carriers are continuously driven to replicative exhaustion,
J Immunol 2005 Dec 15;175(12):8218-25.

[17] Campos C, Pera A, Sanchez-Correa B, et al. (2014),
Effect of age and CMV on NK cell subpopulations,
Exp Gerontol 2014 Jun;54:130-7.

[18] Pourgheysari B, Khan N, Best D, Bruton R, Nayak L, Moss PA (2007),
The cytomegalovirus-specific CD4+ T-cell response expands with age and markedly alters the CD4+ T-cell repertoire,
J Virol 2007 Jul;81(14):7759-65.

[19] Wilkinson GW, Tomasec P, Stanton RJ, et al. (2008),
Modulation of natural killer cells by human cytomegalovirus,
J Clin Virol 2008 Mar;41(3):206-12. [NK Cells].

[20] Derhovanessian E, Maier AB, Beck R, et al. (2010),
Hallmark features of immunosenescence are absent in familial longevity,
J Immunol 2010 Oct 15;185(8):4618-24. [Immunosenescence].
___[Hallmark features of immunosenescence (Papers, Patents, Books, LEF)].

Jim Green posted a message. New comment added.
Jul
08
Jul 08, 2019 at 12:23 PM

Posted on: Jul 07, 2019 at 4:27 PM

I see signs of life regarding Craig Stewart these days here. I recently turned 70 myself (birthday photo below, May 13, 2019, at the WSU RSC Starbucks Coffee Shop). I hope everything is going very well for you and your career as a popular musician. I remember your fine performances online and at the 40th class reunion.

Jim Green posted a message.
Jun
21
Jun 21, 2019 at 4:37 PM

Thanks for writing, Vicki, and a happy Birthday to you in November at your Church
in the city Bentonville, AR USA that gave birth to Walmart, where I go for a good price on many vitamins and popular stock medicine. Reminds me of the Playboy photo model Barbi Benton, for some reason.

Jim Green posted a message.
Jun
20
Jun 20, 2019 at 10:47 PM

My 70th birthday came on May 13, 1949. The pictures below were taken in the WSU RSC center Star Bucks Coffee shop at the time. Some brown hair dye here. The pics were made with an Internet cell phone, the Alcatel Raven LTE A574BL.
Medicine: Astragalus (33 grams/day, 15 days/month or more) for telomerase activation and Natural Killer cell promotion, along with tissue-regenerative Retinol (Vitamin A) (50 caps/day) this month. We suspect the high NK cell promotion due to astragalus reduces the number of proinflammatory senescent cells in order to devour precancerous cells. Stopping the astragalus results in faster-than-expected aging probably due to this NK cell effect. Arginine was taken at 5 grams/day for 15 days of nitric oxide, which acts as a telomerase activator to promote telomere growth in the cells of the vascular endothelium. Hawthorn, a vascular smooth muscle tonic and another telomerase activator, was taken at 7x750 mg/day to tone up smooth muscle cells in the vascular sheath, which helps to treat varicose veins and put in another source of telomerase activation. In addition, Life Extension skin-restoring Ceramides were taken at 1 cap/day for better skin hydration and wrinkle removal, and Vitamin K2 was taken at 200 mcg/day to combat vascular calcification and general ossification of tissues. I think I have seen a case recently in which ossification of ligaments in the neck was relieved by heavy application of vitamin K2 in a way that corrected neck pain that would otherwise have led to expensive surgery. The man seemed to be suffering from a vitamin K2 deficiency from avoiding hard cheeses, which contain plenty of vitamin K2 menaquinones that prevent ossification by calcification and hardening of the heart and the vascular system. I took also neuroregenerative vitamin B12 (10-15 mg/day) to prevent Alzheimer's Disease, and added some exercise (pullups, tricep presses, ect.) for improved brain circulation, telomerase activation, nitric oxide, growth factors, better NK cell levels, and AMPK activation for better cellular autophagy and fat reduction. I took whey protein shakes for muscle mass (leucine from whey drives the mTOR muscle synthesis pathway) and texas ruby red grapefruit juice (an AMPK activator) for definition, with salmon, tuna, or white crab meat for growth. AMPK activators promote cellular autophagy and kick fat and other wastes out of cells. Pomegranate juice (also an AMPK activator and a telomerase activator) was taken daily to prevent atherosclerosis, and it was attempted to rely more on fish than meat to reduce LDL cholesterol from saturated fat, which turns into oxidized LDL that attacks the vascular endothelium to initiate atherosclerosis when combined with sugar for glycoxidation of LDL cholesterol. Glycoxidation of LDL cholesterol produces oxidized LDL cholesterol, the primary cause of atherosclerosis. Staying lean reduces atherosclerosis from C-reactive protein, which goes up in very overweight specimens. I also use an Aloe Vera skin cream. I think this makes a great personal lubricant when combined with the right amount of finely chopped garlic to stop HPV infections that can produce cervical cancer, an old Arab idea for deodorized garlic hot lubes to save a darling like Farah Fawcett with and escape the tally-ho of sin unscathed for the remission of sins. 1,2,3...Infinity. It may be adequately spermicidal, too. Check on Google and at http://www.lef.org/magazine . Fine chopped garlic and fine chopped onions are lilies of the field with wonderful antibiotic and anticancer properties. I used fine chopped garlic at 3-5 cloves per serving, 3 servings per day (served in a salad on crackers) to defeat abcessed teeth and a facial infection in just 3-5 days. Only 4 cloves of garlic may be taken this way continuously for years, however, in order to avoid liver problems. See Hullquist's book on garlic, which also lengthens telomeres and prevents fatty streaks associated with early-stage atherosclerosis, the primary killer of Americans. It seems garlic shows activity against all bacterial, viral, fungual, and yeast pathogens that plaque sexually active adults and sometimes lead to tragic anemia, and perhaps to expensive bone marrow transplants. It seems to defeat all pathogen cells without cellular nuclei, while leaving cells with cellular nuclei (like your cells) alone when applied at the correct dose. So regular garlic purges have been popular where sexual activity was high, although the odor of garlic is quite an effective sex repellant. Mints and so forth are available for garlic breath control, however. Garlic was standard issue to the Red Army in World War II, famous as "Russian Penicillin", and sometimes even shown sculpted on church steeples like St. Basil's in Moscow,
like good news from Jesus of Nazareth, who encouraged us to consider the lilies of the field. Chopped garlic cures leprosy, polio, the Black Death, bubonic plaque, yellow fever, but.... "see that no man knows it" comes out of Jesus sometimes with respect to cures, according to the New Testament, as it might from a country doctor and faith healer somewhat unsure of his methods. I suppose chopped garlic worked more impressively than rubbing mud in the eyes of the blind most of the time, which must have been most displeasing when it failed. Lazarus was covered with sores, probably due to an infection treatable with garlic. A cured man formerly covered with sores could probably come out of a death house. I might add that eating crushed garlic works well on fistula abscesses, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's Disease, so that it can fix some of the most embarrassing and painful consequences of sin. In the 21st Century, Internet searches on garlic cures are easily formulated through a world library of scholarly papers, patents, books, and Life Extension Magazine. I have checked quite a volume of them, myself.
Below: Three photos of Father Green at 70 (produced artist and teacher Dyan, from 1st wife Susan, KS). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5j-12s2HgOc . https://dyangreen.com/news.html .

Jim Green posted a message.
May
13
May 13, 2019 at 4:44 PM

I have a couple of photos of myself taken on Mother's Day, May 12, 2019, the day before my 70th birthday today, May 13, 2019. I used Life Extension skin-restoring ceramides
to improve my old boy act, and also 33 grams/day of astragalus extract for 2 weeks out of each month, tending to produce a de-aging effect of about -5 years/year. I also take 50 caps (a half a bottle) of tissue-regenerative vitamin A every day, as recommended by Donald Trump, The President of the United States, who may take more. To take more vitamin A (retinol), I have to take the 2nd half of the bottle later in the day. To get my height up a bit amid the thundering rush of new troops on the street, I take white crab meat. I could get it up to 6'1" for a while, but you must keep taking some. So now I'm getting it back up again with another white crab meat experiment. I also take hawthorn at 7 caps/day, 750 mg/cap, which is a great smooth muscle toner and telomerase activator. I might improve hawthorn results by taking more. I also get 5 grams of arginine per day to apply nitric oxide as a telomerase activator to the cells of the vascular endothelium. I get pomegranate juice to ward off atherosclerosis otherwise. It is also an AMPK activator that reduces body fat and a telomerase activator. Vitamin B12 at 5-10 mg per day is taken to prevent Alzheimer's and provide neuro-regeneration for the brain. Atherosclerosis is the number 1 killer of Americans and it usually comes from eating sugar with saturated fat, producing glycoxidation of LDL cholesterol from the fat, that attacks the vascular endothelium with oxidized LDL cholesterol, leading to atherosclerosis. Prefer fish without saturated fats to avoid atherosclerosis, and use artificial sweeteners. Serrapeptase, the enzyme a silkworm uses to destroy its cocoon, can be used to wipe out all the atherosclerotic plaque in your body, tending to eliminate angina, heart attack, and stroke. Read up on preventive medicine for elders at Life Extension Magazine at http://www.lef.org/magazine , which features over 20 years of valuable back issues. Use Natural Killer cell boosters like astragalus, garlic, and shiitake mushrooms to keep yourself free of cancer. Natural killer cells attack cancer cells. Cancer is the 2nd worst killer of Americans, as I recall. With Internet, you should be able to figure out all of the cures to all of the causes of death and choose accordingly until you never do go down. It is good to keep exercising, as chronic exercise improves Natural Killer cell count and activity. Good luck at tracking down everything you need to know before you keel over sideways from waiting for your doctor to mention it. Looking forward to 2020. Photos WSU RSC Center.

Jim Green has a birthday today.
May 13, 2019 at 4:34 AM
Jim Green posted a message.
May
09
May 09, 2019 at 3:53 PM

Jim and Sharon North, the Knechts, chemical engineer Tom Denchfield, and I used to have Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners together several years ago. Earlier,
I was in Colorado Springs to visit the University of Colorado there, where I spent some
time in the university library and browsed their course offerings. I got the impression that Jim North
got his PhD in aeronautical engineering at WSU and worked at Boeing for some time on improving flight safety. Sam Knecht (77 in April 2019) and I (70 in May 2019) were both interested in PCs and Internet and further research into PCs, microprocessors, and microcomputer applications.
Jim North and his bride Sharon were a sharp looking couple and
Jim was still interested in aerodynamical engineering when he left for Colorado with
her sometime after 2007. Jim was living in town when the 40th class reunion was held in 2007, which we both attended. I wrote web pages for it and composed the class reunion video DVD.
Below: The North High Graduating Class of 1967 in 2007, when I started experimenting with astragalus for reversing aging.

Jim Green posted a message. New comment added.
Feb
05
Feb 05, 2019 at 3:46 PM

Posted on: Feb 05, 2019 at 3:45 PM

It seems to me that Eddie Raymond was always one of our chief popular heroes,
from John Marshal Junior High School through Wichita High School North's class
of 1967. He lifted weights and was in better condition than most of the students, with
a barrel chest, too. He developed friendships and was a good example in many respects.
You can catch a glipse of Eddie's good humored swaggering aura in the 10th Reunion movie of 1977 below at http://youtu.be/d6CtpYdQ4EQ , which shows Eddie and his friends happy and in good condition 10 years after graduation. Eddie was the gent without a mustache behind the blonde on the left in a early sequence in the movie. He was in a WSU fraternity he compared to Animal House and become a Wichita school system administrator.

Jim Green posted a message.
Jan
26
Jan 26, 2019 at 7:29 AM

Happy birthday, Richard. Congratulations on starting your 8th decade. I recently worked some on JD Arnett, who died at 19 in the Mekong Delta.
He was a mortar squad man doing search and destroy operations in a special dare-devil series of missions ostensibly designed to generate lots of awards and medals. I think he was thrust out of his helicopter into a zone he felt was way too dangerous by a big black guy hoping to eliminate a white runt standing 5'6.5" tall. The man didn't get his salmon treatments enough to get up to Eisenhower dimensions . For going to KU at that time, I won a beautiful gal for an affair featuring filet minion dinners with red wine and croissants and bed afterwards. We met in a history class on France in the Age of Louis the Fourteenth. Colledge was sweet. I stood on the hill and felt I would never die. And all summer long the band kept on playing Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Jim Green updated his profile. View.
Jan
14
Jan 14, 2019 at 2:27 PM
Jim Green has left an In Memory comment for J.D. Arnett.
Jan
03
Jan 03, 2019 at 4:33 PM

ARNETT JAMES DOUGLAS ,  ARMY PFC, Born 1949, Jan 24,

WICHITA, SEDGWICK, Died 1968 September 15, Remains Recovered: Yes.

Based on: U.S. Military Fatal Casualties of the Vietnam War for Home-State-of-Record: Kansas.

"Join the army, if you fail
Look out kid
You're gonna get hit.
But losers, cheaters
Six-time users
Hang around the theaters.
Girl by the whirlpool
Lookin' for a new fool
Don't follow leaders, watch the parkin' meters."

- Subterranean Homesick Blues, Bob Dylan, from Bringing It All Back Home.

 

Jim Green posted a message.
Jan 03, 2019 at 2:12 PM

Did everything turn out to your satisfaction recently?
Any gripes? Would you change anything much in 2019?
Did anything grab, force you into an iron maiden, then release a maid from the mold?
Do you feel your freedom and independence are being adequately protected in the USA?

Jim Green posted a message.
Nov
09
Nov 09, 2018 at 1:11 PM

I hope everything is satisfactory down in Texas, Chris.
How did your move turn out?
What is the environment like? Hospitality?
Still working in the profession?
68th birthday photo below.
I tried milk thistle extract the next year instead of astragalus,
and things got worse and older looking, so I am back to astragalus now.
Found out that astragalus extract (aqueous) can be taken at
11 grams/day to be equivalent to 33 grams of the powder.
Up to 44 grams/day of the extract can be taken for faster
de-aging than 11 grams/day for half the month, which produces
- 5 years/year deaging, which is what I am still using.
I hope you feel secure and healthy in your new environment.
Saturated fat plus sugar produces atherosclerosis, so use those
artificial sweeteners and boil that fat out, keep exercising.

Jim Green posted a message.
Jul
24
Jul 24, 2018 at 9:52 PM

Below is my 68th birthday photo, just about the time I started to experiment with
milk thistle extract instead of astragalus to lower prices. However, I could not get
milk thistle extract to hold my age, and began to look older, while astragalus at the
maximum dose (33 grams/day) could seem to de-age me at -5 years/year when applied
for just half of a month at a time. I had to rub astragalus extract into my scalp to eventually
get my hair color right from the roots out after about a year. Only Life Extension skin-restoring phytoceramides could compete with astragalus for rapid cosmetic de-aging.
Working against heart problems, I avoid saturated fat from meats with sugars,
and take fish, pomegranate juice, and pineapple to produce less atherosclerotic plaque.
In addition, I get more vitamin K2 from pills to avoid vascular calcification.
Milk I get to avoid osteoporosis, and I get vitamin B12 at 1-6 mg/day with fish DHA to
avoid Alzheimer's. There has been a run on vitamin A (retinol) these days,
a generally tissue-regenerative drug, but I get it when I can from pills or from
cod, pollack, and haddock.
Best Wishes for Long Life and Good Health.
I would be interested in reading your CV or resume
anytime. I wonder what you've gone through in Army
service. I was with the cannon at Fort Sill just before
Desert Storm, where I read Glasstone and Dolan on
the effects of nuclear weapons. Later, I published another
book on the topic which derived the Glasstone and Dolan
power law formulae for the fireball and the blastwave.
Never seriously investigated bomb architectures, however,
except for conventional weapons used in WW I, WW II,
ect. I never believed I could get away with publishing such
a thing, because of Beware of Brats with H-bombs problems.
I think perhaps they recently removed an H-bomb from the
engineering building, I mean, Wallace Hall at WSU. It had some
connection with the theft of hypersonic troop transport planes
from WSU by foreign students.
My earliest memory of Richard Wier was meeting him on the way
to Fairmount Elementary School near Hillside, before 6th grade,
when he greeted me to the tune of Battle Hymn of the Republic with:
"Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord,
He was driving down the street in a green and yellow Ford..."

Jim Green has a birthday today.
May 13, 2018 at 4:33 AM
Jim Green posted a message. New comment added.
Jan
03
Jan 03, 2019 at 2:31 PM

Posted on: Jan 03, 2018 at 2:48 PM

Happy Birthday and a Happy New Year, Warren.
I can see you just as you were in 1967. I wonder what
has become of you, and what you look like these days.
I see you live in suburb of San Francisco that was built
after the early 20th century San Francisco earthquake.
I hope you can enjoy the view of the San Francisco Golden Gate Bridge.
I hope you are secure enough against earthquakes.
According to Wikipedia, you are 11 % Hispanic there.
I wonder if you speak Spanish well in El Cerrito,
which suggests everyone is must read as El Sir Writos.
You will be 68 years on your birthday, as I am.
Below is my own 68th Birthday photo, taken May 13, 2017.
For my longevity notes, see
http://www.greenray4ever.com/longevity.html .
My rent went up, so I'm looking a little worse
at this time, and I need to tighten my belt and
get my medicine together anyway. I still work
out with weights and am careful to eat for
longevity and no heart attacks.
Best Wishes,
Jim Green
http://www.greenray4ever.com/home.html